APFY

1020

Space/Materiality:

Parsons Paris: Paris First Year

Non-Liberal Arts

Undergraduate Course

Degree Students (with Restrictions)

Space/Materiality:

Spring 2020

Taught By: Miriam Josi

Section: PC1

CRN: 3701

Credits: 3

Space / Materiality Building is an act of transformation. How do we translate a thought into a thing? How do we take an idea from a flat world to a three-dimensional world? In this class you will learn the techniques that lead from conception to physical construction: sketching, drawing (2D, 3D), shaping, joining, folding, collapsing etc. Space / Materiality will look at three types of space: haptic (related to touch); inhabited (lived in or occupied space); and social and environmental (related to society and the natural world). We embrace learning through failure, taking a trial and error approach to finding out about material properties. We will experiment with concepts such as malleability, weight, texture, durability, and think about ways to engage all the senses as we create three-dimensional projects. Discussion, critique, and written responses will create a class community of idea-sharing. These will help you to understand your work in historical and cultural contexts, including the social and ecological impacts of the materials you use. Class description: This course will navigate an array of themes, among which community, culture and the body in relation to space. Community is defined as a group of people with a commonality of characteristics, interests or goals. We form our personal identities within our communities. A community may define itself through its ethnicity, country of origin, political beliefs, religious beliefs, neighborhood, educational background, or any number of common identifying factors. How do our attitudes about how we inhabit a place, what we wear, how we interact, and how we come together define both our personal space and our shared space? How do we contribute to and advance the cultures of which we are a part? Students will create objects and environments that reflect and respond to existing definitions of cultural identities and will explore the relationship of the individual to the larger society. A body is a physical form that contains living beings. When we refer to “the body,” whose body are we referencing? How do we understand the complexities and nuances of individual bodies within the context of culture, community, history and language? How do ergonomics, structure, and self-image correspond to the shape, movement and impact of the human form?

College: Parsons Paris (CP)

Department: Paris First Year (APFY)

Campus: Paris (PC)

Course Format: Studio (S)

Max Enrollment: 16

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:35am 10/20/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Friday

Times: 10:00am - 12:40pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 300

Date Range: 1/24/2020 - 5/8/2020

Days: Friday

Times: 1:30pm - 4:10pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 300

Date Range: 1/24/2020 - 5/8/2020

Days: Saturday

Times: 10:00am - 12:40pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 300

Date Range: 3/28/2020 - 3/28/2020

Days: Saturday

Times: 1:30pm - 4:10pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 300

Date Range: 3/28/2020 - 3/28/2020

Space/Materiality:

Spring 2020

Taught By: Francesca Bonesio

Section: PC2

CRN: 4443

Credits: 3

Space / Materiality Building is an act of transformation. How do we translate a thought into a thing? How do we take an idea from a flat world to a three-dimensional world? In this class you will learn the techniques that lead from conception to physical construction: sketching, drawing (2D, 3D), shaping, joining, folding, collapsing etc. Space / Materiality will look at three types of space: haptic (related to touch); inhabited (lived in or occupied space); and social and environmental (related to society and the natural world). We embrace learning through failure, taking a trial and error approach to finding out about material properties. We will experiment with concepts such as malleability, weight, texture, durability, and think about ways to engage all the senses as we create three-dimensional projects. Discussion, critique, and written responses will create a class community of idea-sharing. These will help you to understand your work in historical and cultural contexts, including the social and ecological impacts of the materials you use. Class description: This course will navigate an array of themes, among which community, culture and the body in relation to space. Community is defined as a group of people with a commonality of characteristics, interests or goals. We form our personal identities within our communities. A community may define itself through its ethnicity, country of origin, political beliefs, religious beliefs, neighborhood, educational background, or any number of common identifying factors. How do our attitudes about how we inhabit a place, what we wear, how we interact, and how we come together define both our personal space and our shared space? How do we contribute to and advance the cultures of which we are a part? Students will create objects and environments that reflect and respond to existing definitions of cultural identities and will explore the relationship of the individual to the larger society. A body is a physical form that contains living beings. When we refer to “the body,” whose body are we referencing? How do we understand the complexities and nuances of individual bodies within the context of culture, community, history and language? How do ergonomics, structure, and self-image correspond to the shape, movement and impact of the human form?

College: Parsons Paris (CP)

Department: Paris First Year (APFY)

Campus: Paris (PC)

Course Format: Studio (S)

Max Enrollment: 16

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:35am 10/20/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Friday

Times: 10:00am - 12:40pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 301

Date Range: 1/24/2020 - 5/8/2020

Days: Friday

Times: 1:30pm - 4:10pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 301

Date Range: 1/24/2020 - 5/8/2020

Days: Saturday

Times: 10:00am - 12:40pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 301

Date Range: 3/28/2020 - 3/28/2020

Days: Saturday

Times: 1:30pm - 4:10pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 301

Date Range: 3/28/2020 - 3/28/2020

Space/Materiality:

Fall 2019

Taught By: Miriam Josi

Section: PC1

CRN: 4032

Credits: 3

Space / Materiality Building is an act of transformation. How do we translate a thought into a thing? How do we take an idea from a flat world to a three-dimensional world? In this class you will learn the techniques that lead from conception to physical construction: sketching, drawing (2D, 3D), shaping, joining, folding, collapsing etc. Space / Materiality will look at three types of space: haptic (related to touch); inhabited (lived in or occupied space); and social and environmental (related to society and the natural world). We embrace learning through failure, taking a trial and error approach to finding out about material properties. We will experiment with concepts such as malleability, weight, texture, durability, and think about ways to engage all the senses as we create three-dimensional projects. Discussion, critique, and written responses will create a class community of idea-sharing. These will help you to understand your work in historical and cultural contexts, including the social and ecological impacts of the materials you use. Class description: This course will navigate an array of themes, among which community, culture and the body in relation to space. Community is defined as a group of people with a commonality of characteristics, interests or goals. We form our personal identities within our communities. A community may define itself through its ethnicity, country of origin, political beliefs, religious beliefs, neighborhood, educational background, or any number of common identifying factors. How do our attitudes about how we inhabit a place, what we wear, how we interact, and how we come together define both our personal space and our shared space? How do we contribute to and advance the cultures of which we are a part? Students will create objects and environments that reflect and respond to existing definitions of cultural identities and will explore the relationship of the individual to the larger society. A body is a physical form that contains living beings. When we refer to “the body,” whose body are we referencing? How do we understand the complexities and nuances of individual bodies within the context of culture, community, history and language? How do ergonomics, structure, and self-image correspond to the shape, movement and impact of the human form?

College: Parsons Paris (CP)

Department: Paris First Year (APFY)

Campus: Paris (PC)

Course Format: Studio (S)

Max Enrollment: 16

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:35am 10/20/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Friday

Times: 10:00am - 12:40pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 300

Date Range: 8/30/2019 - 12/13/2019

Days: Friday

Times: 1:30pm - 4:10pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 300

Date Range: 8/30/2019 - 12/13/2019

Space/Materiality:

Fall 2019

Taught By: Francesca Bonesio

Section: PC2

CRN: 5222

Credits: 3

Space / Materiality Building is an act of transformation. How do we translate a thought into a thing? How do we take an idea from a flat world to a three-dimensional world? In this class you will learn the techniques that lead from conception to physical construction: sketching, drawing (2D, 3D), shaping, joining, folding, collapsing etc. Space / Materiality will look at three types of space: haptic (related to touch); inhabited (lived in or occupied space); and social and environmental (related to society and the natural world). We embrace learning through failure, taking a trial and error approach to finding out about material properties. We will experiment with concepts such as malleability, weight, texture, durability, and think about ways to engage all the senses as we create three-dimensional projects. Discussion, critique, and written responses will create a class community of idea-sharing. These will help you to understand your work in historical and cultural contexts, including the social and ecological impacts of the materials you use. Class description: This course will navigate an array of themes, among which community, culture and the body in relation to space. Community is defined as a group of people with a commonality of characteristics, interests or goals. We form our personal identities within our communities. A community may define itself through its ethnicity, country of origin, political beliefs, religious beliefs, neighborhood, educational background, or any number of common identifying factors. How do our attitudes about how we inhabit a place, what we wear, how we interact, and how we come together define both our personal space and our shared space? How do we contribute to and advance the cultures of which we are a part? Students will create objects and environments that reflect and respond to existing definitions of cultural identities and will explore the relationship of the individual to the larger society. A body is a physical form that contains living beings. When we refer to “the body,” whose body are we referencing? How do we understand the complexities and nuances of individual bodies within the context of culture, community, history and language? How do ergonomics, structure, and self-image correspond to the shape, movement and impact of the human form?

College: Parsons Paris (CP)

Department: Paris First Year (APFY)

Campus: Paris (PC)

Course Format: Studio (S)

Max Enrollment: 16

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:35am 10/20/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Friday

Times: 10:00am - 12:40pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 301

Date Range: 8/30/2019 - 12/13/2019

Days: Friday

Times: 1:30pm - 4:10pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 301

Date Range: 8/30/2019 - 12/13/2019

Space/Materiality:

Fall 2019

Taught By: Clarisse Labro

Section: PC3

CRN: 8003

Credits: 3

Space / Materiality Building is an act of transformation. How do we translate a thought into a thing? How do we take an idea from a flat world to a three-dimensional world? In this class you will learn the techniques that lead from conception to physical construction: sketching, drawing (2D, 3D), shaping, joining, folding, collapsing etc. Space / Materiality will look at three types of space: haptic (related to touch); inhabited (lived in or occupied space); and social and environmental (related to society and the natural world). We embrace learning through failure, taking a trial and error approach to finding out about material properties. We will experiment with concepts such as malleability, weight, texture, durability, and think about ways to engage all the senses as we create three-dimensional projects. Discussion, critique, and written responses will create a class community of idea-sharing. These will help you to understand your work in historical and cultural contexts, including the social and ecological impacts of the materials you use. Class description: This course will navigate an array of themes, among which community, culture and the body in relation to space. Community is defined as a group of people with a commonality of characteristics, interests or goals. We form our personal identities within our communities. A community may define itself through its ethnicity, country of origin, political beliefs, religious beliefs, neighborhood, educational background, or any number of common identifying factors. How do our attitudes about how we inhabit a place, what we wear, how we interact, and how we come together define both our personal space and our shared space? How do we contribute to and advance the cultures of which we are a part? Students will create objects and environments that reflect and respond to existing definitions of cultural identities and will explore the relationship of the individual to the larger society. A body is a physical form that contains living beings. When we refer to “the body,” whose body are we referencing? How do we understand the complexities and nuances of individual bodies within the context of culture, community, history and language? How do ergonomics, structure, and self-image correspond to the shape, movement and impact of the human form?

College: Parsons Paris (CP)

Department: Paris First Year (APFY)

Campus: Paris (PC)

Course Format: Studio (S)

Max Enrollment: 16

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:35am 10/20/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 12:40pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 302

Date Range: 8/28/2019 - 12/11/2019

Days: Wednesday

Times: 1:30pm - 4:10pm

Building: Parsons Paris

Room: 302

Date Range: 8/28/2019 - 12/11/2019