LNGC

1400

First Year Seminar

Eugene Lang College Lib Arts: Lang College

Liberal Arts

Undergraduate Course

Degree Students (with Restrictions)

FYS: Downtown New York

Fall 2019

Taught By: Clara Latham

Section: A

CRN: 5537

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: DOWNTOWN NEW YORK: New York City is a hub of cultural capital. The music, fashion, and art that becomes popular in New York City carries a weight that is matched by no other city in the world. How did NYC come to be a cultural authority? We will answer this question by focusing on the period of the 1970s, a famously grim period in the city’s history. The subways were dysfunctional, unsafe, and covered in graffiti, unemployment and crime were at an all-time high, police corruption was rampant, and some of the city’s most vulnerable populations had taken up residence in filthy abandoned buildings. Amid these ashes of urban decay, two remarkable genres of music arose, all of which would soon spread across the globe: punk rock (largely from middle-class white kids in the Lower East Side), and hip-hop (from African-Americans at block parties in the South Bronx). We will examine the interactions between these two genres, asking questions about how musical practices interact and consolidate into genres that are associated with cultural identities.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 513

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: Toilets Changed the World

Fall 2019

Taught By: Davida Smyth

Section: AA

CRN: 5919

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: HOW THE TOILET CHANGED THE WORLD: In this project-based seminar, we focus on the development of the toilet and its impact on sanitation and public health from the earliest biblical accounts to the present day and beyond. Class discussions will draw on news articles, blogs, and selections from scientific papers, and labs will contribute to the instructor's microbiological research investigating the impact of human activity on New York water bodies and ecosystems. We will approach access to toilets as a social justice issue both as a public health threat as well as a threat to public safety, particularly that of women. Students will learn about how toilet design and use differs across our globe according to cultural, economic, and political differences. Lastly, students will learn about current developments in improving sanitation and toilet access and how intrepid and creative individuals are developing ways to make money from poop. Assignments will include weekly reflective blogs, laboratory activities, and a collaborative project to design and market concept toilets that are aesthetically pleasing, affordable for low-income communities, and minimize their impact on planetary health. At the end of the course we will assess how this course has affected your perception of how toilets have impacted humans from the perspectives of public health, social justice, aesthetics and design.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 16

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: Academic Entrance 63 Fifth Ave

Room: 618

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Literature and Ecology

Fall 2019

Taught By: Elaine Savory

Section: B

CRN: 5538

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: INTRO TO LITERATURE AND ECOLOGY: Literature offers us the chance to imagine beyond ourselves, and to develop empathy. This introduces students to literature which explores human interaction with the environment, meaning the natural world which supports human life. The course centers on close reading of fiction and poetry, framed by examples of other kinds of writing (such as essays). All these texts encourage us to think about both the environment and social justice in this country and the world and we benefit from carefully reading them.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 263

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: Rethinking Colonialism

Fall 2019

Taught By: Gabriel Vignoli

Section: BB

CRN: 5640

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: RETHINKING COLONIALISM IN THE AMERICAS: This course challenges stereotypical understandings of colonialism in the Americas, which portray Latin America as shaped by the whims of European and later US imperialism and therefore unable to govern itself. Rather, we interrogate the ways in which the colony can be used to understand how Latin America is reshaping its own political grammar. The main conceptual rationale of the course is one sentence in José Martí’s Our America: “The colony lives on in the republic”, meaning by that that post-colonial nations in Latin America had (have) not managed to transcend their colonial heritage. But the political grammar of Latin America is not only one of ‘inability to transcend’: it is also about the colony as experimental site of modernity, where the key-words of the present (religion, tradition, race, nation, caste) are honed. We will draw on a diversity of literary genres to understand how colonial legacies reflect in the contemporary forms and languages of political and economic struggle. The first part of the course addresses the historical, conceptual and administrative connections between the “Reconquest” (Reconquista) of the Iberian Peninsula and the later “Discovery” and consequent “Conquest” (Conquista) of the Americas. Engaging with purity of blood, the codification of system of castes, races, and slavery, and the effects of the Spanish Inquisition, we trace the emergence of previously non-existent identities—the Indian, the Spanish, the Black—that came to define conditions of possibility for the emergence of Latin America as we understand it today. The second part looks at the effects of the Napoleonic Wars, that weakened Spain’s hold over its American colonies resulting in their independence concomitant with the Monroe Doctrine in the US that created distinct spheres of influence for Western imperial powers. It also looks at key revolutions - French, Haitian, and Cuban - that shape the history of the Americas. The third part looks at the effects of colonialism in 20th century Latin America politically through novels written during the so-called Latin American Boom in the late 20th century, and economically looking at how neoliberalism was originally established in the 1970s, and its present day repercussions.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 502

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: What is Political Theory?

Fall 2019

Taught By: Sandipto Dasgupta

Section: DD

CRN: 7666

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: WHAT IS POLITCAL THEORY? This course would be an introductory exploration to the history of political and social thought: the ideas that have helped shape our political world. We will, through several significant texts that have influenced the way we think of our collective political existence, engage with some of the most enduring questions in politics. What is freedom? What are the nature and sources of political authority and obligations? What makes democracy a desirable, or perhaps dangerous, way of organizing our collective life? What is the state and why do (or if) we need it? These are some of the questions we would collectively explore in this course. The goal of the course would be to both a get an understanding of the history of thinking politically, as well as to gain a richer, more critically reflective relationship to our own political present. We would be reading Plato, Hobbes, Rousseau, Marx, and Nietzsche, along with some more contemporary authors.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 501

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Solitude & Community

Fall 2019

Taught By: Jessica Gross

Section: EE

CRN: 7827

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: SOLITUDE AND COMMUNITY: In this course, we will work from the premise that solitude and community are not in conflict, but are rather mutually reinforcing—and both essential. What is college if not movement between community and solitude and back again? Can’t the solitude of scholarship be seen as being in communion with oneself? We will examine stories, poems, and essays that address being alone and being together, investigating how they speak to our need for connection, and the strange and beautiful truth that our minds are only ever our own.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 6:00pm - 7:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 464

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: Poets, Artists, NY School

Fall 2019

Taught By: Angela Carr

Section: F

CRN: 5554

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: POETS AND ARTISTS OF THE NEW YORK SCHOOL: The generation of writers and artists to emerge in the mid-twentieth century in New York City is usually referred to as the New York School. The New York school is most often associated with well known and celebrated figures such as poets Frank O'Hara, John Ashbery, Bernadette Mayer, Amiri Baraka, Alice Notley and Anne Waldman, among others. But what do these writers have in common beyond sharing the geography of New York City in their formative years? This course will examine the intersections between poetry and art from this period and consider their ongoing influence on contemporary writing in New York. In addition to reading the writings of several New York School poets and listening and viewing visual and acoustic works by some of the artists and musicians with whom they collaborated, students will explore first-hand how some of New York's downtown neighborhoods shaped the work in question. Assignments for this course include creative writing options.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 258

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: The Essays of Zadie Smith

Fall 2019

Taught By: Scott Korb

Section: G

CRN: 5555

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: THE ESSAYS OF ZADIE SMITH: Perhaps better known for her novels, Zadie Smith has in recent years come to be known as a master essayist and cultural critic, whose works offer a unique look into the worlds of literature and the arts, technology and the environment, race and identity, and so much more, over the past generation. This advising seminar considers Smith as a voice for our moment, and asks students to take seriously the world they share with Zadie Smith: from Facebook to Get Out, climate change to the experience of joy, Q-Tip to Karl Ove Knausgaard.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 465

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: What are Poets for?

Fall 2019

Taught By: Rebecca Reilly

Section: I

CRN: 5557

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: WHAT ARE POETS FOR?: What are poets for in a destitute time? The philosopher Martin Heidegger asked, meditating on the place of poetry in the modern world. Poets and philosophers have often wondered about each other and sought inspiration in each other’s work. Both philosophy and poetry are ways of thinking deeply about the world. What happens when they overlap; when the border between genres is blurred or willfully ignored? This course traces this genre-crossing in the work of a number of contemporary poets, and some deeply poetic philosophers. We read philosophers who write with the grace and depth of poets, and poets who enlarge the scope of their investigations with the rigor and analytical clarity of philosophers. Poets are likely to include: Gertrude Stein, Paul Celan, Claudia Rankine, Maggie Nelson, Fred Moten; philosophers: Nietzsche, Weil, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Kierkegaard, Deleuze, DuBois, Saint Augustine, Heraclitus.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 513

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Body in Performance Art

Fall 2019

Taught By: Christen Clifford

Section: J

CRN: 5558

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: THE BODY IN PERFORMANCE ART: The seminar focuses on the human body in performance art. What is performance art? Is everyone a performance artist? What makes it different from experimental theatre, or visual art? We will look at artists whose work concentrates on the body: Cassils, Yana Evans, niv acosta, Yoko Ono, among others. Students will go to see performances, read theory and make short performances of their own. The final project is a creative response to a performance artist of their choice.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Academic Entrance 63 Fifth Ave

Room: 200

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Global History of Health

Fall 2019

Taught By: Laura Palermo

Section: L

CRN: 5560

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: GLOBAL HISTORY OF HEALTH AND MIGRATION: Migration and health are key elements of our past and our present. This seminar explores the key contextual connections between health and migration. There are one billion migrants in the world today but this situation is the latest development of a global history where migration is a factor intrinsically related and affected by health. From the perspective of the history of science, we will examine Global South cases of health vis-à-vis national and transnational migration as well as other cases of global circulation and displacement of people. Special consideration will be given to gender and ethnic issues. Contexts to be explored include religious pilgrimages in Africa and Asia, military crisis and refugee displacements in Europe and Latin America and internal and external migration in the Americas.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 501

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Latin American Modernism

Fall 2019

Taught By: Iliana Cepero

Section: N

CRN: 5562

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: LATIN AMERICAN MODERNISM: FROM THE 1920S TO THE 1960S: This course examines the emergence and development of Latin American modernisms in their so-called first and second waves. The first one, which unfolded from the 1920s to the 1940s in Brazil, Mexico and Cuba, witnessed the artists’ combination of imported European avant-garde tendencies—such as post-impressionism and Cubism—with local motifs to produce an art that could reflect a national identity. The second wave pertains to the post World War II raise of abstract tendencies in South America, specifically, concrete abstraction in Argentina and Brazil, and op and kinetic art in Venezuela. Artistic modernisms in the region will be studied in connection with the political and cultural context in Latin American countries. This class will enable students to develop their skills in close reading, discussion, research, and writing by engaging with a range of critical and artistic works. As part of this course, we will visit museum's exhibitions and private art galleries that specialize in Latin American art.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 501

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: The Legacy of the Witch

Fall 2019

Taught By: Kristen Sollee

Section: O

CRN: 5563

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: THE LEGACY OF THE WITCH: The witch is having a moment. Film and television are filled with tales of witches and otherworldly women, visual art and literature are plumbing the depths of pagan lore, and runways are replete with occult symbolism. In this cultural climate, the witch is increasingly viewed as a symbol of female power, but she is equally a symbol of female persecution. Many may now embrace the witch identity for political or spiritual reasons, but thousands of women have suffered ostracism, abuse, torture, and death because of their perceived association with witchcraft. This course will analyze the archetype of the witch through a feminist lens and explore the ways femininity has been demonized since the early modern era. Using a variety of historical and contemporary texts, films, and artworks, students will delve into the legacy of the witch as an enduring cultural icon.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 2:00pm - 3:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 501

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: The Spirit of Things

Fall 2019

Taught By: Abou Farman

Section: P

CRN: 5622

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: THE SPIRIT OF THINGS: AN ANTHROPOLOGY OF RELIGION: This is an introduction to the anthropology of religion. But instead of enumerating major or minor religions and examining their beliefs, we will approach the topic at a slight angle: through the cross cultural study of practices, ideas and events that put into play the relation between spirits and things. We will mainly examine sites where the crucial western secular boundary separating thing and spirit gets troubled – where a person might become a thing, or a thing might appear animate, where we find ghosts in machines as much as in dreams or in tsunamis, where we see spirits seeping into politics, science and medicine, where we encounter shamans encountering a jaguar spirit, activists invoking a higher power to fight injustice, healers healing through spirit possession, inventors reproducing the sounds of the afterlife, technoscientific projects claiming that an avatar is a spiritual person, cryonicists freezing human bodies in order to revive the person in the future...

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 2:00pm - 3:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 263

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Experiencing Time

Fall 2019

Taught By: Robert Sember

Section: Q

CRN: 5624

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: EXPERIENCING TIME: This course is about how time is defined, experienced, and creatively explored. We will examine how time is organized in movement and rhythm, expressions of desire and hope, and systems of efficiency and productivity. We will also learn about the ways in which technologies and aesthetics of time are used for political and economic ends. The following are among the questions that will guide our work: How does space and environment influence our sense of time? How do we creatively represent and manipulate time? As our understanding of time deepens, does our understand of ourselves and others shift? How do manufacturing and media systems organize time?

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 263

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: The Simulation Games

Fall 2019

Taught By: Anne Yust

Section: R

CRN: 5625

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: THE SIMULATION GAMES: DEATH, DISEASE, DENIAL, AND DRUGS: In this project-based seminar, we will analyze current scientific and popular literature and generate data using physical and computer simulations to address a variety of contemporary challenges spanning health, environmental conservation, and population dynamics. Topics include restoration of declining animal populations, genetic engineering of mosquitoes to combat infectious agents such as those that cause Malaria and Zika, the manipulation of news feeds to create “alternative facts” that spread via social media, the determination of a therapeutic dose of medicine, and the possibility of a happy ending for the human race following a zombie apocalypse. A major focus of this course will be coding mathematical simulations using free specialized software. We will design algorithms to visualize changes in populations in space and time. Current issues will be approached within a mathematical and biological framework with an aim to identify ways to make a positive impact on our society and the environment.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 464

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Create/Destroy A Book

Fall 2019

Taught By: Rose Rejouis

Section: T

CRN: 5627

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: CREATE/DESTROY A BOOK: This is a course about writers who use another text as a point of departure – a photo album, a recipe, a mall catalogue, the Bible. Students will be invited to analyze the creative devices the authors use. They will be expected to think about their own creative work in relationship to other texts and other objects.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 2:00pm - 3:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 261

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Plato's Republic

Fall 2019

Taught By: James Dodd

Section: U

CRN: 5629

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: PLATO'S REPUBLIC: This course will introduce the student to philosophical questions, and questioning, through a close reading and discussion of Plato’s Republic. A wide range of issues will be on the table, such as the nature of knowledge and art, the relation between society and the person, and the meaning of war; but everything will turn on one basic question: “What is justice?"

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 263

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: Spiritual Autobiography

Fall 2019

Taught By: Katherine Kurs

Section: X

CRN: 5634

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: SPIRITUAL AUTOBIOGRAPHY: One of the ways we make sense of the trajectory of our lives and of our ultimate questions is by uncovering a narrative of meaning. In this course, we will encounter contrasting contemporary spiritual autobiographies and spiritual memoirs: books and essays (and also documentary film) by writers/artists from diverse backgrounds (African-American, Euro-American, Latina/o, S.E. Asian; Buddhist, Jewish, Catholic, Protestant, Mestiza/indigena, Muslim; lesbian, gay, heterosexual, and transgender) who offer rich and moving examples of the attempt to understand the spiritual impulses that have significantly informed their lives. The constellation of themes we will explore though these texts include: ancestors, lineage, tradition, cell memory; secrets/disclosure and passing; the body, sexuality, desire; concepts of God and the sacred; exile, homecoming, turning and returning; suffering, loss, and mortality; forgiveness and freedom; and the role of autobiographical writing as craft and as a process of liberation, broadly construed.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 261

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: The Forest of Symbols

Fall 2019

Taught By: Robin Wagner-Pacifici

Section: Y

CRN: 5635

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: THE FOREST OF SYMBOLS: This is a course about nature - how humans understand, participate in, and represent the natural world. The course will explore the importance of symbols in constructing our understanding of both the social and the natural world and in carrying out their transformations and exchanges. Of particular concern will be the interfaces between Nature and Religion, Nature and Science, Nature and the Law, Nature and Society, Nature and Illness and Health, and Nature and the Nation. Readings will highlight human actions and symbolic representations of trees and forests in nation building, struggles over water rights, militaristic and territorial aspirations in the design of gardens, scientific engagement with and appropriation of nature and natural processes, human interactions with other animals, and the cultivation of a "natural conscience" in urban and suburban contexts.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 260

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: Examining Urban Place

Fall 2019

Taught By: Andrea Marpillero-Colomina

Section: Z

CRN: 5639

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: EXAMINING URBAN PLACE: “Place”—particularly public space—is where people socialize, exercise, play, relax, encounter other cultures, build social capital, buy and sell goods, interact with friends and meet new people, connect with community, express political views, appreciate architecture, and simply enjoy the weather. Place helps unite us. In this seminar, students will dissect how urban planning and design shapes the qualities of place, affects social dynamics in the city, influences our happiness and health, and help define us. As a crucial component of the course, we will study important historical moments in New York’s urban planning and development, from Robert Moses’s megaprojects to the development of the High Line, to the seemingly ever-present phenomenon of gentrification. Throughout the course, students will use New York City as a living laboratory to produce independent and collaborative research and multimedia projects.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 465

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Poetry and Film

Fall 2019

Taught By: Caveh Zahedi

Section: C

CRN: 5539

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: POETRY AND FILM: THE POETRY OF HART CRANE AND THE CINEMA OF KEN BURNS: This class will involve a careful reading of Hart Crane’s The Bridge and a shot-by-shot analysis of Ken Burns’ The Brooklyn Bridge. We will explore the relationship between poetry and cinema and attempt to understand the ways in which both mediums refract each other. We will also explore the poetry of everyday life.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 502

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: Women of Color Feminism

Fall 2019

Taught By: Yasmeen Chism

Section: CC

CRN: 6508

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: WOMEN OF COLOR FEMINISM: We will begin this course with Audre Lorde's two foundational essays "The Uses of Anger" and "The Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as Power," to shape how we understand activist and intellectual "technologies." Framing technology as the practical application of knowledge, we will consider how Women of Color Feminist thought and activism has invented and mobilized a wide range of technologies to produce a huge body of work toward social change. From This Bridge Called My Back to #This Tweet Called My Back, we will trace these technologies primarily in the United States, but looking beyond the United States as well, to consider this vast repertoire of technological innovation and power. Working across media, we will study the work of folks including Lorde, June Jordan, Chela Sandoval, Marci Blackman, Sara Ahmed, Lisa Nakamura, Janet Mock, Sylvia Wynter, Katherine McKittrick, Monica Roberts, BlackGirlDangerous (Mia McKenzie), The Feminist Wire, the Crunk Collective, INCITE!, bell hooks, Gloria Anzuldúa, Cherrí Moraga, Suey Park, #IdleNoMore, Dina Georgis, Shola Lynch and others. The intellectual project of the course will convene around analyses driven by race, class, gender, sex, citizenship and de/colonization. Students will have the opportunity to read closely, to think together, and to produce creative-critical projects based on course materials.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 260

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: The Economics of Desire

Fall 2019

Taught By: Teresa Ghilarducci

Section: D

CRN: 5552

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: THE ECONOMICS OF DESIRE, CONSUMPTION, AND HAPPINESS: This seminar will explore the paradox that people buy things that don’t make them happy. We examine the benefits to employers and the market system from household dissatisfaction. The students will critically examine literature on economic psychology, Marxist interpretations of commodity fetishism, new frontiers on brain science, and learn some basics of everyday personal finance about budget managing, planning for the future​ including the real cost and rate of return ​of student debt​. ​We will take field trips to the ​slave museum (African American Burial Grounds -- National Park in Manhattan), the Tenement Museum, and the MOMA, and a consumer store of the class's choice.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: 6 East 16th Street

Room: 1108

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Anti-Social Media

Fall 2019

Taught By: Dominic Pettman

Section: E

CRN: 5553

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: ANTI-SOCIAL MEDIA: ATTENTION, DISTRACTION, ADDICTION: This course will explore the special, dynamic, and intimate relationship between attention and distraction, with a special focus on the use and abuse of social media. Topics will include, but not be limited to, the cultural history of isolating and engineering attention, the political advantages of creating distraction, and the technological innovations and arrangements which currently capture and/or deflect the precious resource of the (endangered?) human attention span. We will also be creating and cultivating our own exercises in sustained attention.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 259

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: Visual Culture Today

Fall 2019

Taught By: Lauren Walsh

Section: H

CRN: 5556

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: VISUAL CULTURE: ETHICS & DEBATES: This course examines vital aspects of today’s visual culture. We explore what it means to “read” an image; think about how are images used politically; and ask whether what is “un-seen” is as important as what is seen. Students tackle philosophical, ethical, and political questions, and are encouraged to pursue topics of individual interest for assigned papers and projects. Our explorations involve a variety of visual genres, including a graphic novel, film, magazine ads or commercials, and photography. In examining key debates of the politics and ethics of visual images, this course places special, extended emphasis on images in the context of war as well as humanitarian and social crises. Throughout, we consider our own roles—as consumers and creators of images—in contemporary visual culture, contemplating our relation to imagery through, for instance, aesthetic and humanitarian lenses. Students write reaction papers, a longer essay, and have the option of a visual project. City-based excursions and at least one guest speaker enhance the learning experience.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 261

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019

FYS: Visual Culture:Art&Design

Fall 2019

Taught By: Silvia Vega-Llona

Section: K

CRN: 5559

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: VISUAL CULTURE: ART AND DESIGN: This seminar introduces students to an academic understanding of the close connection between art and design from antiquity to the present, paying special attention to the politics of design across the dynamics of art (classically defined by “autonomy” and “disinterestedness”) and design (defined by function, form and technology). The course is aimed at training students to develop analytical and critical skills when interpreting the different media and materials that both art and design depend on, as in the practice of sculpture, drawing, painting, photography and film, as well as their applications in architecture, furniture and fashion. Besides art history and the history of design, the course will draw on the disciplinary resources of visual anthropology and ethnographic studies in order to broaden the horizon of the subject to also include non-Western visual cultures of art and design.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 502

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: NY's Literary Landscape

Fall 2019

Taught By: Rachel Aydt

Section: M

CRN: 5561

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: IN THEIR FOOTSTEPS: NEW YORK'S LITERARY LANDSCAPE: This course aims to tap into the storied literary landscape of New York City in order to delve into our own creative writing and close reading practices. As a hybrid exploration/creation lab, we will conduct a multi-tiered engagement with different New York-based authors (both dead and alive) to soak in their habitat. We will partake in short communal readings of texts; visit historical points of reference and relevance; craft individual and group exercises based upon the text and excursions; and workshop them with the goal of leaving with a portfolio of your own New York-centric work. In class and out of class readings will include E.B. White, Ric Burns, Walt Whitman, Anne Waldman, Allen Ginsburg, Patti Smith, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Andy Warhol, James Baldwin, Edith Wharton, Joseph Mitchell, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and many more.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 263

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Global Slaveries

Fall 2019

Taught By: Amanda Bellows

Section: S

CRN: 5626

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: ANCIENT AND MODERN GLOBAL SLAVERIES: This course examines global slaveries in their varying forms: debt labor, forced labor, domestic servitude, and sexual slavery. Diverse systems of bondage have existed for thousands of years, appearing in Ancient Greece, medieval Eastern Europe, and after the transatlantic slave trade began during the modern era, the Americas. Slavery even persists in present-day nations like the African country of Mauritania, where the institution was outlawed in 1981, and India, where there are an estimated 14.3 million slaves. Even in the United States, human traffickers buy and sell men and women to perform manual labor and sexual services. This course will trace the evolution of slavery across space and time, with an emphasis on regions of the world where slavery is still prevalent today. Students will grapple with important ethical questions through philosophical and economic texts to create definitions for terms like slavery, bondage, liberty, and freedom. Readings include philosophical treaties, historical books, autobiographical narratives, contemporary articles written by investigative journalists, and the oral testimonies of former slaves. The course will also evaluate audio and visual materials including songs, photographs and documentary films.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 464

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Improvising the Possible

Fall 2019

Taught By: Danielle Goldman

Section: V

CRN: 5630

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: IMPROVISING THE POSSIBLE: Improvisation is all around us. It occurs in a wide range of human activity, from creative practice in the arts to everyday conversations to spontaneous negotiations with one’s environment. Nevertheless, perhaps because of its liveness and unpredictability, improvisation is often difficult to define and analyze. In this course, students draw from recent scholarship on improvisation within the fields of philosophy, anthropology, musicology, as well as dance and performance studies, in order to grapple with the nature of improvisation, and to consider its potential as a meaningful political practice. At various points, the course also turns to jazz and jazz studies, where one finds a vast and rigorous analysis of improvisation, and often an exacting look at race, gender, and the politics of performance. Where does improvisation come from, and where might its power exist? In addition to critical texts, students consider a range of live and recorded performances throughout the semester.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 2:00pm - 3:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 260

Date Range: 8/26/2019 - 12/16/2019

FYS: Lunacy, Crime & Addiction

Fall 2019

Taught By: McWelling Todman

Section: W

CRN: 5631

Credits: 4

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR: LUNACY, CRIME & ADDICTION: This course explores the curious and often confounding ways in which human civilizations have wrestled with the concepts of mental illness, criminal behavior and addiction across time. We examine how superstitious beliefs, religious convictions, and the desire to maintain existing political and economic power imbalances have often conspired to blur the boundaries between these concepts.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 4:06am 7/22/2019

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 262

Date Range: 8/27/2019 - 12/12/2019