LPHI

2020

Philosophy II: Modern

Eugene Lang College Lib Arts: Philosophy

Liberal Arts

Undergraduate Course

Degree Students

Philosophy 2: Modern

Fall 2018

Taught By: Kelly Gawel

Section: A

CRN: 1338

Credits: 4

"Modern philosophy" has typically designated a period in European intellectual history that was defined by an experience of skepticism brought about by the Scientific Revolution and Protestant Reformation: an attempt to discover a rational foundation for knowledge (epistemology) at a time when traditional authorities and ways of knowing could no longer be trusted to provide human beings with a source of orientation. In this course, we will study the modern period by focusing on a particular question that defined it: to what extent—if any—can experience provide a legitimate source of such knowledge? In addition to developing careful interpretations of some of the period’s principal authors who addressed this question (Luther, Montaigne, Bacon, Descartes, Locke, Leibnitz, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant), in the final part of the course we will also consider how resources from feminist, queer, and social epistemology (Scott, Alcoff, Oksala, Salamon, Collins, and Ahmed) have complicated or challenged the conceptions of experience, knowledge, and philosophy that have been bequeathed to us by the moderns.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Philosophy (LPHI)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Waitlist*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 11:40am 6/21/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 1:50pm - 3:30pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

Philosophy 2: Modern

Spring 2018

Taught By: Philip Schauss

Section: A

CRN: 1671

Credits: 4

"Modern philosophy" has typically designated a period in European intellectual history that was defined by an experience of skepticism brought about by the Scientific Revolution and Protestant Reformation: an attempt to discover a rational foundation for knowledge (epistemology) at a time when traditional authorities and ways of knowing could no longer be trusted to provide human beings with a source of orientation. In this course, we will study the modern period by focusing on a particular question that defined it: to what extent—if any—can experience provide a legitimate source of such knowledge? In addition to developing careful interpretations of some of the period’s principal authors who addressed this question (Luther, Montaigne, Bacon, Descartes, Locke, Leibnitz, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant), in the final part of the course we will also consider how resources from feminist, queer, and social epistemology (Scott, Alcoff, Oksala, Salamon, Collins, and Ahmed) have complicated or challenged the conceptions of experience, knowledge, and philosophy that have been bequeathed to us by the moderns.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Philosophy (LPHI)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 11:38am 6/21/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: 6 East 16th Street

Room: 1001

Date Range: 1/22/2018 - 5/14/2018

Philosophy 2: Modern

Spring 2018

Taught By: Ryan Gustafson

Section: B

CRN: 5689

Credits: 4

"Modern philosophy" has typically designated a period in European intellectual history that was defined by an experience of skepticism brought about by the Scientific Revolution and Protestant Reformation: an attempt to discover a rational foundation for knowledge (epistemology) at a time when traditional authorities and ways of knowing could no longer be trusted to provide human beings with a source of orientation. In this course, we will study the modern period by focusing on a particular question that defined it: to what extent—if any—can experience provide a legitimate source of such knowledge? In addition to developing careful interpretations of some of the period’s principal authors who addressed this question (Luther, Montaigne, Bacon, Descartes, Locke, Leibnitz, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant), in the final part of the course we will also consider how resources from feminist, queer, and social epistemology (Scott, Alcoff, Oksala, Salamon, Collins, and Ahmed) have complicated or challenged the conceptions of experience, knowledge, and philosophy that have been bequeathed to us by the moderns.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Philosophy (LPHI)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 11:38am 6/21/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: 6 East 16th Street

Room: 911

Date Range: 1/22/2018 - 5/14/2018