NFDS

3401

Eating Identities: Food, Gender and Race

Schools of Public Engagement: Food Studies

Liberal Arts

Undergraduate Course

Degree Students

Eating Identities

Fall 2018

Taught By: Katherine Magruder

Section: A

CRN: 4926

Credits: 3

This course explores how gender and race are experienced and expressed through food. It starts from the premise that food is at once political and quotidian, and this is what gives it power. Far from a benign activity, preparing and consuming food becomes a forum for the performance, reproduction, negotiation, manipulation, and at times rejection of racial and gendered identities. Readings and discussions address how appetites are marked by gender and race, how cooking has served as a medium of female oppression and empowerment, how soul food evolved as a productive and problematic symbol of blackness, and how identities change through distance and difference. Topics include home-cooking, ethnic restaurants, norms of taste and pleasure, ideal bodily images, migration and diaspora, and the shifting location of women and racial minorities within the food system today. This course counts toward the Ethnicities and Race minor.

College: Schools of Public Engagement (NS)

Department: Food Studies (NFDS)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 25

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 11:41am 6/21/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday

Times: 6:00pm - 7:50pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/17/2018