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LFYW

1000

Writing the Essay I

Eugene Lang College Lib Arts: Lang College

Liberal Arts

Undergraduate Course

Degree Students

WTEI: New York: City of Poets

Spring 2019

Taught By: Miller Oberman

Section: A

CRN: 2041

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: New York: City of Poets. In this first year seminar we will read and write about the poems and poets of New York City, with a particular focus on those that speak to diasporic and immigrant experience, multilingual forms of expression, social justice movements. From the “imprisoned lightning” of Emma Lazarus’ sonnet “The New Colossus,” inscribed on the Statue of Liberty, to the “inviolate curve” of Hart Crane’s Brooklyn Bridge, we will read poems we can place in the city; our class discussions and assignments will take us out of the classroom to visit the places these poets describe. Texts may include poems by: Allen Ginsberg, Langston Hughes, Patricia Spears Jones, Yusef Komunyakaa, Federico García Lorca, Suzanne Gardinier, Marie Howe, Tan Lin, Dante Micheaux, Marianne Moore, Tracie Morris, Eileen Myles, Nuyorican Poets, Ishle Yi Park, Camille Rankine, Derek Walcott, and Yiddish Poets. We will hone the skills of close reading, the personal essay, and annotation, with a final project involving scholarly and creative elements.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 16

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 3:50pm - 5:30pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 458

Date Range: 1/23/2019 - 5/13/2019

WTEI: Adventures in Boredom

Spring 2019

Taught By: Rollo Romig

Section: B

CRN: 1949

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: ADVENTURES IN BOREDOM. All day long, boring experiences threaten our enjoyment of life. Waiting for the train. Washing the dishes. Attending required college courses. But what do we mean when we call something “boring”? Where does boredom come from? And is there any benefit to being bored? In this first-year writing seminar we’ll explore these questions and many more through an exciting and unpredictable selection of reading and writing assignments. Topics will include: small talk, long speeches, the science of how we experience time, handheld devices, the internet, capitalism, “women’s work,” reality television, intentionally boring films, Buddhism, asceticism, meditation, mindfulness, heroin, prison, the Internal Revenue Service, the fear of missing out, the lives of zoo animals, life in a boring town, living off the grid, summer vacation, heaven, and silence.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 16

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: 6 East 16th Street

Room: 1104

Date Range: 1/22/2019 - 5/9/2019

WTEI: The Loss of Oneself

Fall 2018

Taught By: Jessica Gross

Section: C

CRN: 1202

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE LOSS OF ONESELF: MENTAL ILLNESS NARRATIVES. Writing means translating your own idiosyncratic experiences and thoughts into a common language. In this first-year writing seminar, we’ll take narratives of mental illness as our starting point, examining a series of writings, both nonfiction and fiction, that convey personal dissolution. As a class, we’ll examine how, and to what extent, these writers communicate psychic disturbance on the page. What makes these pieces work, and how do they fall short? Students will practice formulating, developing, and expressing ideas in essay form, ranging from the personal to the critical.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: 6 East 16th Street

Room: 1003

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI: Art and Activism

Fall 2018

Taught By: Alizah Salario

Section: CC

CRN: 8345

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: ART AND ACTIVISM. Artists are society’s conscience. Artists are useless. Artists are the gatekeepers of truth. Artists are manic, depressive, selfish, indispensable...and complicated. In this first-year writing seminar, students will explore the role of the creative individual in society. Through close reading and discussion, we will examine the tension between the artist’s role as a provocateur and a catalyst for social change, and the artist’s need to retreat from public life and find solitude in order to create. We will examine how creators of all stripes engage critically with pressing social issues, the role of the artist in tumultuous times, and how class, race and gender affect artistic access and opportunity. Texts will interrogate the artist in history and popular culture, and may include essays, poetry and creative nonfiction by James Baldwin, Alexander Chee, Leslie Jamison, Maggie Nelson, Claudia Rankine and Wallace Stevens. Students will learn to read closely, think critically and write clearly, with an emphasis on revision and workshopping peer essays. Ultimately, we will ask if Baldwin’s essay on the precise role of the artist — “to illuminate that darkness….to make the world a more human dwelling place” — still holds true today.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 3:50pm - 5:30pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 513

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/18/2018

WTEI: Identity: What is it?

Fall 2018

Taught By: Allen Strouse

Section: FF

CRN: 8403

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: IDENTITY: WHAT IS IT? Today, the question of identity preoccupies public discussion, and “identity politics” has fierce partisans both pro and con. But in this first-year writing seminar, we will take a step back from that fracas in order to ask, in a more basic way, what identity actually is. (Indeed, “it depends,” as President Bill Clinton famously said, “what the meaning of ‘is’ is.”) We will look at how various thinkers—professional philosophers, artists, amateur bloggers, and we ourselves—understand what it means to “be” in different and particular ways. Readings may include: Plato, Parmenides (excerpt); Aristotle, Categories (excerpt); Fine, “Things and Their Parts”; Antin, “The Theory and Practice of Post-Modernism”; Boethius; Baudrillard, Simulcra and Simulation (excerpt); Get Out and essays and other movies on brain-swapping; Behar, Bigger Than You: Big Data and Obesity.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 509

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI: Policing Women's Bodies

Fall 2018

Taught By: Nina Boutsikaris

Section: O

CRN: 1466

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: SMILE MORE: POLICING WOMEN'S BODIES. This first-year writing seminar encourages students to question the images of “ideal” physical beauty, sexuality, and behavior that are constantly at work on our subconscious—through the media, advertising, psychological historical legacy, the built spaces we inhabit, and the environments in which we are raised—informing worth, cultural currency, and social roles. By analyzing a variety of creative and theoretical writings (i.e. Sady Doyle, Rebecca Solnit, bell hooks, Alice Walker, T Fleischmann, Leslie Jamison, Alexander Chee, and John Berger) as well as visual representation, we will unpack the socially constructed expectations of the female and other non-male bodies we love to worship, fear, shame, and police. Through writing and workshopping, we’ll explore creative techniques writers might call upon to reclaim, subvert, or otherwise negotiate this cultural gaze.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 615

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: Writing Toward Inclusion

Fall 2018

Taught By: Joshunda Sanders

Section: Q

CRN: 3454

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: WRITING TOWARD INCLUSION. The narratives of those who represent various feminisms, particularly women of color, are currently constructed, disseminated and elevated across media in ways that offer opportunities for critical expansion of our notion of inclusion. In this first-year writing seminar, we’ll examine fiction and nonfiction that explores the lived multidimensional feminisms at work in today’s society. As the term intersectionality, coined by Dr. Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989, nears its 30th birthday, does its meaning need to be expanded or updated to help us write the reality of our collective experience accurately, or is it still adequate? Have changing gender norms and expanded notions of gender allowed for us to expand feminisms to the queer community, or do old binaries continue to be replicated? What is the value of inclusion for the future of canons, politics and democracy? Reacting to the work of authors who have composed critical primary intersectional texts, students will practice drafting, discussing and editing their ideas in personal and/or critical essays on topics of inclusion, intersectionality and feminisms. Authors may include Evette Dionne, Nell Painter, Claudia Rankine, Zora Neale Hurston, Gloria Anzaldua, Cherrie Moraga, Eve Ewing, bell hooks, Alice Walker and Audre Lorde.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: 6 East 16th Street

Room: 904

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI: The Writing Journey

Fall 2018

Taught By: Alison Kinney

Section: V

CRN: 3748

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: BEGINNING & ENDING THE WRITING JOURNEY. “You must go on, I can’t go on, I’ll go on.” These final words of Samuel Beckett’s novel The Unnamable form the core of any writing practice, from submitting homework, to private journaling, to publishing essays, stories, and books. In this writing-intensive course, we will explore the difficulties of the writer’s journey: fear and anxiety about getting started, persistence in shaping narratives, reaching conclusions—and doing it all over again in revision. We will examine essays by living, working writers representing diverse backgrounds, places, and nonfiction narrative practices, who take literal and figurative journeys into their writing identities and the world, published by venues such as The New Yorker, The New York Times, Buzzfeed, Granta, Catapult, and genre publications (the outdoors, food, humor). Students will write and workshop essays of their own, learn to critique peer work, and engage in exercises that address issues of brainstorming, overcoming writer’s block, developing arguments, and revising work.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 3:50pm - 5:30pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 702

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: Life/Science & the Exper

Fall 2018

Taught By: Tara Menon

Section: W

CRN: 4018

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: LIFE/ SCIENCE AND THE EXPERIMENTAL METHOD. What is an essay if not an attempt, an experiment? This literary form, which helped create the modern concept of subjective experience, emerged around the same time as the scientific concept of experiment and involves similar appeals to the empirical, to trial and error. In this first-year writing seminar, we explore what an experimental approach to essay-writing might mean by investigating the intertwined roots of modern science, liberal and radical politics, and individual subjectivity. From Goethe’s “The Experiment as Synthesis of Subject and Object” to Gandhi’s The Story of My Experiments with Truth, from Zola’s conception of the novel as social and psychological thought experiment to the twentieth-century and contemporary tradition of experimental writing, we examine and learn from the ways in which this fundamental concept of scientific modernity has been appropriated and subverted by artistic, literary, and political figures.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 262

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI: The Wandering Self

Fall 2018

Taught By: Tara Fitzgerald

Section: X

CRN: 4019

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE WANDERING SELF. Travel writing can be many things at once: exploration of new terrain, discovery of the self, reinvention of the self, escapism, cultural education, and much much more. Travel writing is almost as old as both writing itself and the human urge to know and/or conquer the world around us, but in this modern age of all-access travel where anyone and everyone can blog about their adventures we will consider how and why certain travelogues rise above the fray. In this first-year writing course we will consider the role of place (how to make the unfamiliar familiar, or make the familiar new again) and self (who are you and/or who do you want to be?), in the acts of both traveling and then writing about traveling, through our own writing and via in-class discussions of texts by writers including Jenny Diski, Pico Iyer, Rebecca Solnit, Jamaica Kincaid and Bruce Chatwin.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Open*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 701

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: Feminine Deities

Fall 2018

Taught By: Brenda Ray

Section: A

CRN: 1490

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: FEMININE DEITIES. What is the Female God? How is she depicted in classic literature and what kind of healing can she provide in an otherwise patristic culture? This first-year writing seminar examines these questions and more, in pursuit of fully understanding a God that has been historically denied. Beginning in ancient myths and biblical literature, moving up though 15th century England, and landing in our modern world, this class will explore feminine deities. How does God as mother differ from God as father? How are these notions affected by differences in culture? What insights can we draw through this work about ourselves and the never-ending pursuit of truth? Readings may include classical mythology, the Bible, Toni Morrison, Virginia Woolf, Alice Walker, Ntozake Shange, among others.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Academic Entrance 63 Fifth Ave

Room: 202

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: Life/Science & the Exper

Fall 2018

Taught By: Tara Menon

Section: AA

CRN: 4561

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: LIFE/ SCIENCE AND THE EXPERIMENTAL METHOD. What is an essay if not an attempt, an experiment? This literary form, which helped create the modern concept of subjective experience, emerged around the same time as the scientific concept of experiment and involves similar appeals to the empirical, to trial and error. In this first-year writing seminar, we explore what an experimental approach to essay-writing might mean by investigating the intertwined roots of modern science, liberal and radical politics, and individual subjectivity. From Goethe’s “The Experiment as Synthesis of Subject and Object” to Gandhi’s The Story of My Experiments with Truth, from Zola’s conception of the novel as social and psychological thought experiment to the twentieth-century and contemporary tradition of experimental writing, we examine and learn from the ways in which this fundamental concept of scientific modernity has been appropriated and subverted by artistic, literary, and political figures.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 263

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: Writing About Values

Fall 2018

Taught By: Stephen Massimilla

Section: B

CRN: 1201

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: WRITING ABOUT VALUES: In this first-year writing seminar, we will explore fundamental issues of our lives in order to develop key analytic and argumentative skills. We will discuss what is really worth striving for and what makes a good or meaningful life. Topics include questions of priorities, definitions of good and evil, cultural and moral relativity, the nature of love, the challenges of suffering and death, and sociopolitical issues such as minority rights, feminism, and the environment. Texts may include short works by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Plato, Euripides, Shakespeare, Woolf, Sartre, June Jordan, Michael Pollan, Al Gore, and many others, as well as Eastern and Western religious texts and topical newspaper articles. In the course of composing and workshopping essays related to the readings, students will focus on tackling the stages of the writing process, entering a conversation, identifying key value conflicts, anticipating counter arguments, identifying sources, and engaging the reader. We will work on developing close reading and research skills, logical strategies, rhetorical techniques, and grammatical clarity, along with the effective deployment of summary, quotation, citation, and tone.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 262

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: Revision & Reenactment

Fall 2018

Taught By: M Milks

Section: BB

CRN: 4601

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: REVISION & REENACTMENT. In this first-year writing seminar, we will focus on two related creative strategies—revision and reenactment—to structure a broader discussion about failure and transformation, repetition and intervention, the present in relation to the past. We will first look at theories, methods, and examples of revision, including materials from The New School’s Archives and Special Collections, thinking through our own relationships to the revision process and trying out new approaches, using digital tools such as Draftback. We will then turn to examples of writing and art that adopt revision as an artistic strategy—e.g., fan fiction, parody, erasure, and other forms of appropriation—and examine their various effects. In our final unit, we will focus on reenactment as a mode of re-vision that dives into history and uses new contexts to produce new meaning. As part of this unit, you will be invited to revisit the New School’s Archives, identifying material and/or events that could lend themselves to reenactment. Throughout the course, we will subject our own writing, and the course, to frequent revision. Readings include essays, short stories, a novel, a play, a few films, and a range of visual and performance art. Writing assignments will include the personal essay and a critical essay, with the option to develop a creative project supplemented by self-analysis.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Academic Entrance 63 Fifth Ave

Room: 312

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: New York, City of Poetry

Fall 2018

Taught By: Miller Oberman

Section: D

CRN: 2629

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: NEW YORK, CITY OF POETRY. In this first year seminar we will read and write about the poems and poets of New York City, with a particular focus on those that speak to diasporic and immigrant experience, multilingual forms of expression, social justice movements. From the “imprisoned lightning” of Emma Lazarus’ sonnet “The New Colossus,” inscribed on the Statue of Liberty, to the “inviolate curve” of Hart Crane’s Brooklyn Bridge, we will read poems we can place in the city; our class discussions and assignments will take us out of the classroom to visit the places these poets describe. Texts may include poems by: Allen Ginsberg, Langston Hughes, Patricia Spears Jones, Yusef Komunyakaa, Federico García Lorca, Suzanne Gardinier, Marie Howe, Tan Lin, Dante Micheaux, Marianne Moore, Tracie Morris, Eileen Myles, Nuyorican Poets, Ishle Yi Park, Camille Rankine, Derek Walcott, and Yiddish Poets. We will hone the skills of close reading, the personal essay, and annotation, with a final project involving scholarly and creative elements.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 458

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: Policing Women's Bodies

Fall 2018

Taught By: Nina Boutsikaris

Section: DD

CRN: 4653

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: SMILE MORE: POLICING WOMEN'S BODIES. This first-year writing seminar encourages students to question the images of “ideal” physical beauty, sexuality, and behavior that are constantly at work on our subconscious—through the media, advertising, psychological historical legacy, the built spaces we inhabit, and the environments in which we are raised—informing worth, cultural currency, and social roles. By analyzing a variety of creative and theoretical writings (i.e. Sady Doyle, Rebecca Solnit, bell hooks, Alice Walker, T Fleischmann, Leslie Jamison, Alexander Chee, and John Berger) as well as visual representation, we will unpack the socially constructed expectations of the female and other non-male bodies we love to worship, fear, shame, and police. Through writing and workshopping, we’ll explore creative techniques writers might call upon to reclaim, subvert, or otherwise negotiate this cultural gaze.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 11:55am - 1:35pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 513

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: Writing About Values

Fall 2018

Taught By: Stephen Massimilla

Section: E

CRN: 1203

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: WRITING ABOUT VALUES. In this first-year writing seminar, we will explore fundamental issues of our lives in order to develop key analytic and argumentative skills. We will discuss what is really worth striving for and what makes a good or meaningful life. Topics include questions of priorities, definitions of good and evil, cultural and moral relativity, the nature of love, the challenges of suffering and death, and sociopolitical issues such as minority rights, feminism, and the environment. Texts may include short works by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Plato, Euripides, Shakespeare, Woolf, Sartre, June Jordan, Michael Pollan, Al Gore, and many others, as well as Eastern and Western religious texts and topical newspaper articles. In the course of composing and workshopping essays related to the readings, students will focus on tackling the stages of the writing process, entering a conversation, identifying key value conflicts, anticipating counter arguments, identifying sources, and engaging the reader. We will work on developing close reading and research skills, logical strategies, rhetorical techniques, and grammatical clarity, along with the effective deployment of summary, quotation, citation, and tone.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Academic Entrance 63 Fifth Ave

Room: 201

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: Revision & Reenactment

Fall 2018

Taught By: M Milks

Section: EE

CRN: 8361

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: REVISION & REENACTMENT. In this first-year writing seminar, we will focus on two related creative strategies—revision and reenactment—to structure a broader discussion about failure and transformation, repetition and intervention, the present in relation to the past. We will first look at theories, methods, and examples of revision, including materials from The New School’s Archives and Special Collections, thinking through our own relationships to the revision process and trying out new approaches, using digital tools such as Draftback. We will then turn to examples of writing and art that adopt revision as an artistic strategy—e.g., fan fiction, parody, erasure, and other forms of appropriation—and examine their various effects. In our final unit, we will focus on reenactment as a mode of re-vision that dives into history and uses new contexts to produce new meaning. As part of this unit, you will be invited to revisit the New School’s Archives, identifying material and/or events that could lend themselves to reenactment. Throughout the course, we will subject our own writing, and the course, to frequent revision. Readings include essays, short stories, a novel, a play, a few films, and a range of visual and performance art. Writing assignments will include the personal essay and a critical essay, with the option to develop a creative project supplemented by self-analysis.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 16

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 3:50pm - 5:30pm

Building: Academic Entrance 63 Fifth Ave

Room: L106

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/18/2018

WTEI: New York, City of Poetry

Fall 2018

Taught By: Miller Oberman

Section: F

CRN: 2630

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: NEW YORK, CITY OF POETRY. In this first year seminar we will read and write about the poems and poets of New York City, with a particular focus on those that speak to diasporic and immigrant experience, multilingual forms of expression, social justice movements. From the “imprisoned lightning” of Emma Lazarus’ sonnet “The New Colossus,” inscribed on the Statue of Liberty, to the “inviolate curve” of Hart Crane’s Brooklyn Bridge, we will read poems we can place in the city; our class discussions and assignments will take us out of the classroom to visit the places these poets describe. Texts may include poems by: Allen Ginsberg, Langston Hughes, Patricia Spears Jones, Yusef Komunyakaa, Federico García Lorca, Suzanne Gardinier, Marie Howe, Tan Lin, Dante Micheaux, Marianne Moore, Tracie Morris, Eileen Myles, Nuyorican Poets, Ishle Yi Park, Camille Rankine, Derek Walcott, and Yiddish Poets. We will hone the skills of close reading, the personal essay, and annotation, with a final project involving scholarly and creative elements.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 11:55am - 1:35pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 458

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: The Poet's Prose

Fall 2018

Taught By: Kristi Steinmetz

Section: G

CRN: 1944

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE POET'S PROSE. Oscar Wilde says that “a poet can survive anything but a misprint.” So what happens when we employ that exactitude of poetry to essay writing? And what does it really mean to experience life as a poet? In this first-year writing course, we will engage poetic techniques to craft creative and expository essays. Reading and writing assignments will include poems and essays in a variety of forms, traditions, and voices. There will be an emphasis on informed discussion, peer workshopping, in-class writing, and collaborative projects. Course texts will include historical and contemporary works, especially by those who identify as both poet and prose writers, such as John Donne, Aphra Behn, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Gertrude Stein, Joy Harjo, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Adrienne Rich, Mark Doty, Li-Young Lee, Claudia Rankine, and Kevin Young.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 11:55am - 1:35pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 618

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI: The Retrospectoscope

Fall 2018

Taught By: Brie Bouslaugh

Section: H

CRN: 1204

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE RETROSCOPE: ON MEMORY AND THE SELF. In this first-year writing course we will explore the way memory shapes how we see ourselves, others and the world around us. How do the circumstances under which a memory is formed affect us? How does the language we use to talk to ourselves and about ourselves inform how we assemble our sense of self? To what extent is the act of forgetting actually a core component in identity-making? As the semester progresses we’ll explore work by science writers, essayists and novelists in an attempt to understand the malleable nature of memory and the impact it has on how we interact with our reality. Some authors who will help construct our own arguments about this deeply personal, but universal topic, include: Jorge Louis Borges, David Eagleman, Jill Bolte-Taylor, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Roland Barthes, Jamaica Kincaid and Tim O’Brien, among others. Steeped in their unique and varying points of view, we will then write two short essays and one longer rumination on the nature of memory and identity.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 11:55am - 1:35pm

Building: 6 East 16th Street

Room: 904

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI: Culture and Conflict

Fall 2018

Taught By: Jonathan Liebson

Section: I

CRN: 2631

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: CULTURE AND CONFLICT. This first-year research seminar offers a broad survey of social, political and cultural topics, with students having a greater choice over subject matter as the semester progresses. In the first unit, on Race, Gender and Violence, we’ll read personal narratives by such writers as Brent Staples, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Katha Pollitt. In the second unit, students expand into journalism and media research as they pursue topics of personal and/or local interest. In the final unit, students choose a film or television show and explore that piece within the backdrop of a larger social context.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 602

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: Too Cool for School

Fall 2018

Taught By: Nkosi Bandele

Section: J

CRN: 1945

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: TOO COOL FOR SCHOOL. This first-year writing seminar encourages students to consider the ways they are taught and the unspoken assumptions about their education. To do this effectively, students hone skills for reading, analyzing, and thinking about structures of implicit thought in formal education. To think through complicated issues, write to examine that thinking, share their ideas, and make arguments based on their perspectives and understandings. Authors include Paulo Friere, Adrienne Rich, Mary Louise Pratt, Susan Griffin, and Ralph Ellison.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 11:55am - 1:35pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 713

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: Adventures in Boredom

Fall 2018

Taught By: Rollo Romig

Section: K

CRN: 1205

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: ADVENTURES IN BOREDOM. All day long, boring experiences threaten our enjoyment of life. Waiting for the train. Washing the dishes. Attending required college courses. But what do we mean when we call something “boring”? Where does boredom come from? And is there any benefit to being bored? In this first-year writing seminar we’ll explore these questions and many more through an exciting and unpredictable selection of reading and writing assignments. Topics will include: small talk, long speeches, the science of how we experience time, handheld devices, the internet, capitalism, “women’s work,” reality television, intentionally boring films, Buddhism, asceticism, meditation, mindfulness, heroin, prison, the Internal Revenue Service, the fear of missing out, the lives of zoo animals, life in a boring town, living off the grid, summer vacation, heaven, and silence.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: 6 East 16th Street

Room: 1104

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI: Love and Death

Fall 2018

Taught By: Lucas Corcoran

Section: L

CRN: 1467

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: LOVE AND DEATH. We are born. We fall in love (or not). We die. In this first-year writing seminar, we will explore how the search for love and the fear of death plays upon, perhaps, all aspects of our being. From a first-person view, we will examine how we have authentically lived love and death, composing creative non-fiction, memoir, and cultural- criticism. From a third-person view, we will study critically what love and death might mean for others, engaging with philosophy, literature, and film. With love and death as a compass, our travels will also take us down paths lit up by passion, sex, commitment, and loss. Constantly learning from one another, this seminar will focus on in-class dialogue and writing widely across disciplines and genres. Authors and directors may include Plato, Friedrich Nietzsche, Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Simone Weil, Sylvia Plath, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais, and bell hooks.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 465

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI: Feminism in Non-Western

Fall 2018

Taught By: Shobha Rao

Section: M

CRN: 1990

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: FEMINISM IN NON-WESTERN TRADITIONS. In this first-year writing seminar, taught by the Grace Paley Teaching Fellow, students will consider feminism, and the feminist movement, from a range of non-Western cultures, mores, mythologies, and manifestations. Readings will focus on contemporary and historical texts, with particular emphasis on how these texts illuminate, expand, and differ from the commonly accepted narrative of Western feminism, most recently embodied by the #MeToo movement. Readings may include work by Clarice Lispector, Han Kang, Anna Akhmatova, Forugh Farrokhzad, Layli Long Soldier, Edwidge Danticat, and others. We will also examine the works of such filmmakers as Ana Lily Amirpour and Joan Chen, and discuss ways in which their work, in concert with written texts, subverts or endorses the accepted means and ends of feminism in the western world. Written assignments will include personal essay, critical analysis, and a creative project aimed at engaging and deconstructing the various dimensions of feminism. Students emerge from this course with a deeper appreciation of non-Western struggles for expression and actualization, and how these struggles fit into our own aspirations for gender equality.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: 6 East 16th Street

Room: 705

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI: Culture and Conflict

Fall 2018

Taught By: Jonathan Liebson

Section: N

CRN: 1302

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: CULTURE AND CONFLICT. This first-year research seminar offers a broad survey of social, political and cultural topics, with students having a greater choice over subject matter as the semester progresses. In the first unit, on Race, Gender and Violence, we’ll read personal narratives by such writers as Brent Staples, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Katha Pollitt. In the second unit, students expand into journalism and media research as they pursue topics of personal and/or local interest. In the final unit, students choose a film or television show and explore that piece within the backdrop of a larger social context.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 259

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: The Faith Between Us

Fall 2018

Taught By: Scott Korb

Section: P

CRN: 1643

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE FAITH BETWEEN US. Look at the headlines, flip through a magazine, or click the link to your favorite website, and faith and religion very often appear—separating one believer from another (and from non-believers) or living between us, forming the glue that holds communities together. Through a consideration of a variety of contemporary religion writing—mostly from newspapers, popular magazines, journals, and websites—this first-year writing seminar will ask students to take their own excursions into faith and faithlessness, and through a process of writing, workshopping, and the all-important rewriting, create the stories that, in Joan Didion’s words, “we tell ourselves in order to live.” Readings may include works by Jeff Sharlet and Karen Armstrong, Paul Elie and Marilynne Robinson, Peter Manseau and Matthew Teague, Christopher Hitchens and John Jeremiah Sullivan.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 458

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI: Universe Means One Song

Fall 2018

Taught By: Danielle Rouse

Section: R

CRN: 3455

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: UNIVERSE JUST MEANS ONE SONG. Music is within us all; the pulse is first the sign of life. In this first-year writing seminar, we will explore personal connections to music as well as its cultural implications as it pertains to technology, activism, and sexuality. We will consider the ways in which music, musicians, and musical movements have influenced media, politics, and language. In addition, we will examine lyricism and storytelling techniques, and the socio-political impact of artists like Gil Scott-Heron, Nina Simone, Talib Kweli, Lauryn Hill, and N.E.R.D. Writing assignments will include a personal narrative connecting to a musician, instrument or piece of music; a critical analysis of the construction or constrictions of the music industry; and a final project combining personal narrative and an academic argument on a pressing social or political issue.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 263

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI:Family,Identity&Justice

Fall 2018

Taught By: Nancy Agabian

Section: S

CRN: 3460

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: FAMILY, IDENTITY, AND JUSTICE. This first-year writing seminar will explore how family, culture, place, and politics affect our sense of identity and how this in turn influences why and how we fight for social justice. Our readings will further examine issues of belonging, privilege, loss, trauma, and/or displacement. Through reflective writing, students will consider their own personal experiences with these issues. Through readings about liminal spaces of identity and intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, disability, etc., students will engage the question: How can such complexities of identity provide us with new, alternative, or deepened perspectives through which to view social justice? Students will also be asked critique methodologies for fighting for social justice as seen in a current event or news story, which may include analysis of campaigns and actions such as Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, Families Belong Together, BDS, mobilizations on campus, etc. Writers and thinkers to be read include Thi Bui, Edwidge Danticat, Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie, James Baldwin, Salman Rushdie, Eula Biss, J.D. Vance, Randa Jarrar, Henry Louis Gates, Gloria Anzaldua, Kiese Laymon, and Ta-Nehisi Coates.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: 6 East 16th Street

Room: 902

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI: The Poet's Prose

Fall 2018

Taught By: Kristi Steinmetz

Section: T

CRN: 3461

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE POET'S PROSE. Oscar Wilde says that “a poet can survive anything but a misprint.” So what happens when we employ that exactitude of poetry to essay writing? And what does it really mean to experience life as a poet? In this first-year writing course, we will engage poetic techniques to craft creative and expository essays. Reading and writing assignments will include poems and essays in a variety of forms, traditions, and voices. There will be an emphasis on informed discussion, peer workshopping, in-class writing, and collaborative projects. Course texts will include historical and contemporary works, especially by those who identify as both poet and prose writers, such as John Donne, Aphra Behn, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Gertrude Stein, Joy Harjo, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Adrienne Rich, Mark Doty, Li-Young Lee, Claudia Rankine, and Kevin Young.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 509

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTE I: Mourning and Melancolia

Fall 2018

Taught By: Rebecca Reilly

Section: U

CRN: 1668

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: MOURNING AND MELANCHOLIA. In this first-year writing seminar we look at texts that confront depression, grief and longing. Poets and philosophers have often examined these emotional states as passage through a “dark night of the soul” in which an author confronts the despair within and finds a way to traverse it. These personal and spiritual reckonings are often deep examinations of the self in the world and a search for meaning in existence. This writing intensive course considers philosophical, poetic and other renderings of mourning and melancholia in authors such as Roland Barthes, Julia Kristeva, Karen Green, Sigmund Freud, Maggie Nelson, James Baldwin, Paul Celan and others. Through a series of essays, we begin a conversation in our own writing and thought with these authors and issues.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Academic Entrance 63 Fifth Ave

Room: L101

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018

WTEI: Writing on the Verge

Fall 2018

Taught By: Bret Gladstone

Section: Y

CRN: 4021

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: WRITING ON THE VERGE. This first-year research seminar will focus on literary works depicting the physical, mental and social extremities of the human experience, from psychological disturbances to natural disasters. What kinds of strategies, for example, do writers employ to represent traumatic events and traumatized perspectives? What can these altered states of awareness tell us about the way our minds construct reality? Keeping those questions in mind, we’ll pay special attention to writing that captures the way extreme situations radically deconstruct our ordinary conceptions of time, memory, selfhood and otherness, forcing characters to confront the limits of their own organizing intellects. In that respect, studying how writers capture these “extreme” states of mind on the page will be a way of learning how human consciousness itself can be represented in rich, strange, and more comprehensively “realistic” ways. Authors may include James Baldwin, Anne Carson, Samuel Beckett, Joy Williams, Don DeLillo, Cormac McCarthy, Toni Morrison, J.M. Coetzee, and Lydia Millet, as well as a wide array of interdisciplinary essays on the subject.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 261

Date Range: 8/28/2018 - 12/13/2018

WTEI: The Wandering Self

Fall 2018

Taught By: Tara Fitzgerald

Section: Z

CRN: 4560

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE WANDERING SELF. Travel writing can be many things at once: exploration of new terrain, discovery of the self, reinvention of the self, escapism, cultural education, and much much more. Travel writing is almost as old as both writing itself and the human urge to know and/or conquer the world around us, but in this modern age of all-access travel where anyone and everyone can blog about their adventures we will consider how and why certain travelogues rise above the fray. In this first-year writing course we will consider the role of place (how to make the unfamiliar familiar, or make the familiar new again) and self (who are you and/or who do you want to be?), in the acts of both traveling and then writing about traveling, through our own writing and via in-class discussions of texts by writers including Jenny Diski, Pico Iyer, Rebecca Solnit, Jamaica Kincaid and Bruce Chatwin.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 15

Enrollment Status: Closed*

*Enrollment status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 5:03pm 10/19/2018

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 261

Date Range: 8/27/2018 - 12/12/2018