LFYW

1000

Writing the Essay I

Eugene Lang College Lib Arts: Lang College

Liberal Arts

Undergraduate Course

Degree Students

WTEI:Stories We Tell Ourselves

Spring 2022

Taught By: Bureen Ruffin

Section: A

CRN: 1899

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE STORIES WE TELL OURSELVES. This first-year writing seminar examines the theory and practice of creative nonfiction, focusing on the memoir and the personal essay. Students will learn how to translate personal experience into effective pieces of writing. We will study the techniques of “writing the self,” integrating literary analysis and creative writing and an exploration of the role of memory and imagination in reconstructing and shaping the past. We will read a variety of texts and examine the ways writers use language to bring their subjects to life, reading not only for the story but, more importantly, for distinctive prose style and technique. As writers we all have unique concerns, backgrounds, and perspectives. Our goal is to effectively communicate what we have seen, heard, and felt, focusing on the world outside of ourselves as much as our interior worlds. Our workshops will help us focus on hearing our unique voices and the voices of others, offering new ideas and thoughtful critiques. We will learn how to use the truth of our lives to create compelling narratives that feature quality thinking, depth of insight, and impressive prose style.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:27am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 2:00pm - 3:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEI:The Coming of Age Novella

Spring 2022

Taught By: Kyle McCarthy

Section: B

CRN: 1808

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE COMING OF AGE NOVELLA. What does it mean to grow up? In this first-year writing seminar, we will read and respond to a range of 20th and 21st century novellas that reimagine and reinvigorate the classic literary genre of the bildungsroman, which traditionally depicts a young person’s moral or spiritual education. As we read, we will investigate how various writers depict separation from the family, sexuality, intimations of mortality, and questions of justice. We’ll ask questions such as What is knowledge? and How is the (growing, changing) self constituted by its particular social world? Authors may include Morrison, Kincaid, Greene, Maxwell, McCullers, Torres, and Murata.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:27am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEI: Doubt

Fall 2021

Taught By: David Palmer

Section: A

CRN: 11150

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: DOUBT: In a 2013 New York Times piece, Philip Lopate called the essay an exercise in doubt. Rejecting the often-touted virtues of certainty, Lopate instead invited essayists to honor the deeply unsure and divided nature of human consciousness and to embrace doubt as integral to the essay writing process. In this first-year writing seminar, we will explore and consider the value—and possible limitations—of Lopate’s insights in discussing and practicing various essay forms: the personal essay, the argumentative essay, and the exploratory essay. Texts may include readings by Joan Didion, Philip Lopate, David Foster Wallace, Cheryl Strayed, Brent Staples, Amy Tan, Richard Blanco, Timothy O’Brien, Junot Diaz, Zadie Smith, Tom Junod, Roxane Gay, and more. Our encounters with these readings are designed to inspire your ideas and unique approaches to your own writing, which will be harnessed through lots of brainstorming, free writing, workshopping, drafting, redrafting, and critical feedback from your instructor, your fellow students, and yourself.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 602

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/13/2021

WTEI:Stories We Tell Ourselves

Fall 2021

Taught By: Bureen Ruffin

Section: AA

CRN: 12998

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE STORIES WE TELL OURSELVES. This first-year writing seminar examines the theory and practice of creative nonfiction, focusing on the memoir and the personal essay. Students will learn how to translate personal experience into effective pieces of writing. We will study the techniques of “writing the self,” integrating literary analysis and creative writing and an exploration of the role of memory and imagination in reconstructing and shaping the past. We will read a variety of texts and examine the ways writers use language to bring their subjects to life, reading not only for the story but, more importantly, for distinctive prose style and technique. As writers we all have unique concerns, backgrounds, and perspectives. Our goal is to effectively communicate what we have seen, heard, and felt, focusing on the world outside of ourselves as much as our interior worlds. Our workshops will help us focus on hearing our unique voices and the voices of others, offering new ideas and thoughtful critiques. We will learn how to use the truth of our lives to create compelling narratives that feature quality thinking, depth of insight, and impressive prose style. Readings may include works by Virginia Woolf, Jamaica Kincaid, Philip Lopate, Joan Didion, Maggie Nelson, James Baldwin, Kiese Laymon, Zadie Smith, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Rachel K. Ghansah, David Sedaris, Audre Lorde, Alexander Chee, and more.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 502

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/17/2021

WTEI: Writing About Values

Fall 2021

Taught By: Stephen Massimilla

Section: B

CRN: 11151

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: WRITING ABOUT VALUES: In this first-year writing seminar, we will explore fundamental issues of our lives in order to develop key analytic and argumentative skills. We will discuss what is really worth striving for and what makes a good or meaningful life. Topics include questions of priorities, definitions of good and evil, cultural and moral relativity, the nature of love, the challenges of suffering and death, and sociopolitical issues such as minority rights, feminism, and the environment. Texts may include short works by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Plato, Euripides, Shakespeare, Woolf, Sartre, June Jordan, Michael Pollan, Al Gore, and many others, as well as Eastern and Western religious texts and topical newspaper articles. In the course of composing and workshopping essays related to the readings, students will focus on tackling the stages of the writing process, entering a conversation, identifying key value conflicts, anticipating counter arguments, identifying sources, and engaging the reader. We will work on developing close reading and research skills, logical strategies, rhetorical techniques, and grammatical clarity, along with the effective deployment of summary, quotation, citation, and tone.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 601

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/13/2021

WTEI: We Are Not Ancestors?

Fall 2021

Taught By: Khaliah Williams

Section: BB

CRN: 13016

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: WE ARE NOT OUR ANCESTORS?: EXPLORING THE BIPOC WRITERS FROM 2010 - PRESENT. This first year seminar students will focus on interrogating the works of contemporary writers of colors telling the stories of today with the consideration of the legacies that inspired them. Over the course of the semester students will read, write, and respond to fiction, nonfiction, and poetry written by BIPOC writers in the last ten years. Authors whose works we may explore include Alexander Chee, Deesha Philyaw, Elizabeth Acevedo, Morgan Parker, Kiese Laymon, Danez Smith, Sterling HolyWhiteMountain and others. At the semester’s end, students will have a portfolio of original writings that consider the ways legacy shapes our creative voices.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 8:00pm - 9:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 458

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/17/2021

WTEI:The Coming of Age Novella

Fall 2021

Taught By: Kyle McCarthy

Section: C

CRN: 11152

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE COMING OF AGE NOVELLA. What does it mean to grow up? In this first-year writing seminar, we will read and respond to a range of 20th and 21st century novellas that reimagine and reinvigorate the classic literary genre of the bildungsroman, which traditionally depicts a young person’s moral or spiritual education. As we read, we will investigate the ways in which the novella’s compression and distillation shape coming-of-age tales, and ask questions such as What is knowledge? and How is the (growing, changing) self constituted by its particular social world? Authors may include Jamaica Kincaid, Tao Lin, William Maxwell, Carson McCullers, and Jeanette Winterson.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 601

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: Your Fav Poet's Fav Poet

Fall 2021

Taught By: Emily Sernaker

Section: CC

CRN: 13265

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: YOUR FAVORITE POET'S FAVORITE POET. is a class celebrating poetic lineage. Students will discover that every poet has to start somewhere – and that behind every good writer, is a good reader. Together, we will demystify the idea that poetry is for the select few and explore the art form through the lens of inclusivity, legacy and community. We will read and assess the work of poets recommended by Ross Gay, Airea D. Matthews, Mahogany L. Browne, Naomi Shihab Nye, Tongo Eisen-Martin, Dunya Mikhail, Gregory Pardlo, Marwa Helal, Joseph Millar, Tyehimba Jess, Hanif Abdurraqib, Ada Limón, Patricia Smith, Dorianne Laux, Tina Chang, Sharon Olds and more. Essay assignments will range from annotations on poetic craft to larger explorations of social justice, inspiration, risk-taking, imagination and permission. Students will also write essays identifying poetic choices that resonate and spark their imaginations, giving direction to their own creative work.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 501

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: Profound Boredom

Fall 2021

Taught By: Rollo Romig

Section: D

CRN: 11153

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: PROFOUND BOREDOM. All day long, boring experiences threaten our enjoyment of life. Waiting for the train. Washing the dishes. Attending required college courses. But what do we mean when we call something “boring”? Where does boredom come from? And is there any benefit to being bored? In this first-year writing seminar we’ll explore these questions and many more through an exciting and unpredictable selection of reading and writing assignments. Topics will include: small talk, long speeches, the science of how we experience time, handheld devices, the internet, capitalism, “women’s work,” reality television, intentionally boring films, Buddhism, asceticism, meditation, mindfulness, heroin, prison, the Internal Revenue Service, the fear of missing out, the lives of zoo animals, life in a boring town, living off the grid, summer vacation, heaven, and silence.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 618

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI:The Source of Self-Regard

Fall 2021

Taught By: Marwa Helal

Section: F

CRN: 11157

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE SOURCE OF SELF-REGARD: WRITING AND RE[SEARCH] WITH TONI MORRISON. Toni Morrison was one of the most insightful observers of the world, the arts, and the changing landscape of American and global culture. From writing about family to institutions, essays and criticism, we’ll explore, discover, develop, and interrogate the vital spark of imagination in the realm of nonfiction essay writing. We will push the boundaries of this genre as you take your eye—and your “I”—in search of subjects both inside and outside of yourself. The world—or worlds are our subject. Together we’ll seek topics in people, things, and ideas. You’ll move from shorter writing tasks to longer and more involved ones, while reading published essays to accompany your own work, and digging into the archive for purposeful research. Students emerge from this course with more confidence in the process of formulating, developing, and expressing your ideas with the written word.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 601

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/13/2021

WTEI: Bye Bye Bi

Fall 2021

Taught By: Kristi Steinmetz

Section: G

CRN: 11158

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: BYE BYE BI. Bisexual erasure is real. The gender binary is real. Non-binary identities are real. Growing up biracial is real. Binary math makes what we see on computer screens real. And, in the U.S., bipartisan politics are all too real. So what does it mean to be bi anything? Why is there biphobia within the LBGTQIA+ community? How do we deal with the reality that any identity labeled with the prefix bi- can be inherently polarizing by definition? This course will try to understand why our world is so dependent on binary constructs. In this first-year writing seminar, we will explore personal, political, and cultural issues related to bi- experiences. We will examine how bi- issues reflect the ways that sexuality and desire are shaped by - yet often liberated from - the patriarchy’s paradigms of gender. To make visible the hidden impact of monosexism in healthcare, relationships, and even DEI initiatives, we will engage with a wide variety of creative works, contemporary media, and historical documents. Students will investigate the evolutionary dynamics of related identity representations and how they converge in texts from James Baldwin, Shakespeare, Adrienne Rich, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Jack Halberstam, Judith Butler, Albrecht Dürer, Maria Yoon, Virginia Woolf, Dorianne Laux, Margaret Cho, Julia Serano, Chrystos, Ernest Hemingway, Tania Israel, Jeanette Winterson, and Frida Kahlo. Close reads of digital media (such as Grey’s Anatomy, Veep, Schitt’s Creek, Bridgerton clips; YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok influencer videos; social activists’ Twitter feeds; .gov and .org websites) along with community-building discussions involving current events and news in real time, will also be considered to produce personal, journalistic, and critical writings of reflection and possibility.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 518

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: What Haunts Us

Fall 2021

Taught By: Rachel Aydt

Section: I

CRN: 11160

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: OBSESSED: WRITING ABOUT WHAT HAUNTS US. In this first-year writing seminar, we’ll visit the landscapes that leave their observers obsessed, and observe and put into practice our own writing obsessions. How can an incredibly close study of a subject find its way into our work? What's the difference between deep research and obsession? We'll read essays, fiction, and poetry by Jhumpa Lahiri (Italian language); John McPhee (truckers); Vinson Cunningham (sermonic essays); Jonathan Franzen (birds); Natalie Goldman (craft essay on obsession in Writing Down the Bones); Natalie Diaz (poetry); Roxanne Gay (Scrabble); Sarah Vowell (Assassination Vacation); Siddhartha Mukherjee (cancer); M.F.K. Fisher (frugality)

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 464

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: Culture and Conflict

Fall 2021

Taught By: Jonathan Liebson

Section: J

CRN: 11161

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: CULTURE AND CONFLICT. This first-year research seminar offers a broad survey of social, political and cultural topics, with students having a greater choice over subject matter as the semester progresses. In the first unit, on Race, Gender and Violence, we’ll read personal narratives by such writers as Brent Staples, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Katha Pollitt. In the second unit, students expand into journalism and media research as they pursue topics of personal and/or local interest. In the final unit, students choose a film or television show and explore that piece within the backdrop of a larger social context.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 6:00pm - 7:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 458

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/13/2021

WTEI: The House Race Built

Fall 2021

Taught By: Helen Rubinstein

Section: L

CRN: 11163

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: DISMANTLING THE HOUSE THAT RACE BUILT. Race is a story. This is why it’s often called a “social construct”—an invented idea, a fiction—even as it’s a fiction so powerful it shapes the realities of our histories, our social systems, and our daily lives. We have seen what happens when, as one contributor to the Racial Imaginary anthology writes, Americans' imaginations are “riddled with the stories racism built.” How do we write against these stories, producing texts that not only refuse to reinscribe racist narratives, but also weaken and dismantle them? What possibilities are born when we approach writing as a potentially anti-racist act? This first-year writing seminar progresses from inquiry to action: we will examine U.S. conceptions of race as represented in contemporary texts, practice writing anti-racist texts ourselves, and finally design a public-facing project that aims to share what we’ve learned with our communities.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 2:00pm - 3:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 602

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: The Queer Page

Fall 2021

Taught By: Miller Oberman

Section: M

CRN: 11164

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE QUEER PAGE: In this first-year seminar we will read, discuss, and respond in writing to a multiplicity of queer texts, from foundational works of queer theory to contemporary fiction, essays and poetry. This course will consider the relationship between body and text, and we will practice close reading a wide range of LGBTQIA textual bodies, queer pages that work to counter hegemonic norms. Some questions this course will raise include: How do queer texts function as a space for intersectional analysis, and what are the connections and places of overlap between bodies and texts? Texts may include work by: Sara Ahmed, Gloria Anzaldua, James Baldwin, Judith Butler, Meg Day, Samuel Delaney, Jack Halberstam, E. Patrick Johnson, Rickey Laurentiis, Audre Lorde, José Esteban Muñoz, Maggie Nelson, Robert McRuer, Adrienne Rich, Eve Sedgwick, Julianna Spahr, and Monique Wittig. This course will ask that you hone skills in close reading, writing the personal essay, and will involve a final project involving scholarly and creative elements.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 2:00pm - 3:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 601

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: Great Short Fiction

Fall 2021

Taught By: Jonathan Liebson

Section: O

CRN: 11166

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: GREAT SHORT FICTION: This first-year writing seminar aims to develop the broader skills of close reading and clear, analytical writing. The syllabus offers a survey of the short story with authors both canonical and contemporary, including James Joyce, Franz Kafka, Shirley Jackson, Flannery O’Connor, Raymond Carver, Amy Hempel, Sherman Alexie, and others. The course explores such themes as character and conflict, experimental and psychological fiction, and moral fiction, as well as the role of voice, descriptive language, and symbols. The course requires ongoing shorter assignments plus multiple drafts of three formal essays.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 517

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/13/2021

WTEI: Everyone's a Critic

Fall 2021

Taught By: Bureen Ruffin

Section: P

CRN: 11167

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: EVERYONE'S A CRITIC. Pop culture has historically been dismissed as frivolous or a passing fad, the fodder of naïve youth – but we all create and digest popular culture. Pop culture is, in some ways, a reflection of who we are at any given moment in time. Studying what's popular allows us to deepen our understanding of humankind: age, race, gender, class, sexuality, nationality, and the realities of social, historical, and political contexts. These lenses, taken together or perhaps in opposition, provide opportunities to see ourselves authentically and to change, progress, and heal. In this first-year writing seminar, we will recast pop culture as perhaps the truest reflection of who we are, what we believe, desire, and value. The authors we will read are ideologically and stylistically diverse, but what they have in common is their concern with social, cultural, and political issues and their strong distinctive prose. Our discussions will focus not only on the ideas presented in the texts but also on the structural and rhetorical features of the texts themselves, the language in which the ideas are embodied. Students will develop critical writing and reading skills and make persuasive arguments through writing about the issues that are most prevalent in their lives. The writers and thinkers we may read include: W.E.B Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Malcolm Gladwell, Virginia Woolf, Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, Zora Neale Hurston, Hilton Als, Barbara Ehrenreich, Susan Sontag, E.M. Forster, Zadie Smith, and more.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 2:00pm - 3:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 517

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: Not I

Fall 2021

Taught By: Bret Gladstone

Section: R

CRN: 11169

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: NOT I: ON WRITING TOWARD CONSCIOUSNESS. In her novel The Waves, Virginia Woolf reminds us that looming behind every person’s story about selfhood is the ambient enormity of consciousness itself: “the body of the complete human being whom we have failed to be, yet at the same time cannot forget.” Woolf’s frustration with our “remorseless analysis” and advertisement of identity is grounded in a deep sensitivity to how much is lost when we dissociate ourselves from a far more comprehensive and mysterious sense of what it feels like to be alive. Almost a century after Woolf published her major works, contemporary neuroscience now offers us radical new insight into those shifting qualities and states of awareness that comprise personhood. That research has also ratified Woolf’s sustained argument that being—the full psychosomatic experience of a human life—is simply more than selfhood. In this interdisciplinary first-year writing seminar we’ll explore both literature and science in an attempt to write about the parts of personhood we usually fail to get on the page, from ordinary boredom to non-conscious cognition to what Buddhists call bare attention. We’ll operate from the premise that the purpose of writing consciousness in a richer, more comprehensive way is to write beyond the human. Readings will pair fiction by writers like Woolf, Don DeLillo, and Joy Williams with selections from works on linguistics, evolutionary biology, cognitive science and neurobiology.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 502

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: Reverse the Essay

Fall 2021

Taught By: Brie Bouslaugh

Section: S

CRN: 11175

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: REVERSE ENGINEERING THE ESSAY. Sometimes an author’s name becomes so synonymous with a particular kind of prose or style – or even human situation – that it becomes an eponymous adjective or proprietary trademark: We speak about things as being Dickensian or Pynchonesque or Kafka-esque in the way that we use words like Velcro or Xerox or BandAid. But what are we really talking about when we talk about “style”? If a work of art becomes completely permeated by one particular author’s vision, it’s not just because that author has given herself permission to fully inhabit her own quality of perception or pursue one set of concerns to exciting and unpredictable places, but also because she is deploying a very particular set of technical strategies at the level of the sentence. What makes a story Kafka-esque? What makes a David Foster Wallace sentence so distinctly “DFW”? In this seminar we will reverse engineer various brands of literary styles, taking a close look at their interior designs and architectures. Part of this will rest upon the premise that a certain amount of emulation is wholesome and that the way out of our influences is through them. What can we learn by trying very earnestly – and ultimately unsuccessfully – to sing along with the voices of the writers who move us the most.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 263

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: Writing About Values

Fall 2021

Taught By: Stephen Massimilla

Section: E

CRN: 11156

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: WRITING ABOUT VALUES. In this first-year writing seminar, we will explore fundamental issues of our lives in order to develop key analytic and argumentative skills. We will discuss what is really worth striving for and what makes a good or meaningful life. Topics include questions of priorities, definitions of good and evil, cultural and moral relativity, the nature of love, the challenges of suffering and death, and sociopolitical issues such as minority rights, feminism, and the environment. Texts may include short works by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Plato, Euripides, Shakespeare, Woolf, Sartre, June Jordan, Michael Pollan, Al Gore, and many others, as well as Eastern and Western religious texts and topical newspaper articles. In the course of composing and workshopping essays related to the readings, students will focus on tackling the stages of the writing process, entering a conversation, identifying key value conflicts, anticipating counter arguments, identifying sources, and engaging the reader. We will work on developing close reading and research skills, logical strategies, rhetorical techniques, and grammatical clarity, along with the effective deployment of summary, quotation, citation, and tone.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: No

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 6:00pm - 7:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 050

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/13/2021

WTEI:Stories We Tell Ourselves

Fall 2021

Taught By: Bureen Ruffin

Section: H

CRN: 11159

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: THE STORIES WE TELL OURSELVES. This first-year writing seminar examines the theory and practice of memoir and personal essay through a study of techniques of writing the self, integrating literary analysis and creative writing in an exploration of the role of memory and imagination in reconstructing and shaping the past. Students will learn how to translate personal experience and research into effective pieces of writing. To that end, we will read a variety of texts including memoir, personal essay, and travel writing, among others, and examine the ways writers use language to bring their subjects to life, reading not only for the story but, more importantly, also for distinctive prose style and technique. As writers we all have unique concerns, backgrounds, and perspectives. Our goal is to effectively communicate what we have seen, heard, and felt, focusing on the world outside of ourselves as much as our interior worlds. Our workshops will help us focus on hearing our unique voices and the voices of others, offering new ideas and thoughtful critiques. We will learn how to use the truth of our lives to create compelling narratives that feature quality thinking, depth of insight, and impressive prose style. Readings may include works by Virginia Woolf, Jamaica Kincaid, Philip Lopate, Joan Didion, Michel de Montaigne, James Baldwin, Margaret Atwood, Zadie Smith, Pico Iyer, Jeanette Winterson, Margo Jefferson, Mary Karr, Mary McCarthy, Audre Lorde, Maggie Nelson, Alexander Chee, and more.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: No

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 6:00pm - 7:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 406

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: Too Cool for School

Fall 2021

Taught By: Nkosi Bandele

Section: K

CRN: 11162

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: TOO COOL FOR SCHOOL. This first-year writing seminar encourages students to consider the ways they are taught and the unspoken assumptions about their education. To do this effectively, students hone skills for reading, analyzing, and thinking about structures of implicit thought in formal education. To think through complicated issues, write to examine that thinking, share their ideas, and make arguments based on their perspectives and understandings. Authors include Paulo Friere, Adrienne Rich, Mary Louise Pratt, Susan Griffin, and Ralph Ellison.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: No

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 517

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/13/2021

WTEI:Elements of Fact&Fiction

Fall 2021

Taught By: Haley Hach

Section: N

CRN: 11165

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: ELEMENTS OF FACT AND FICTION: In this first-year writing seminar we will ponder the importance, necessity and psychological functional of storytelling. As a species, humans are storytelling animals. We can’t explain ourselves or know each other without using, sharing, inventing and assuming stories. What is universal in reason? How does it work? Who decides the context of meaning? We’ll begin the semester reading old stories—fairy tales, for instance—and study the evolution of metaphor and culture. Good stories are timeless and relatable. How, then, do we keep churning out new ways of thinking old stories? We’ll read novels, memoirs and literary theory. We’re actively seeking an understanding of the goal(s) of narrative drive. How is learning achieved? What do we want to understand when we read other peoples’ experiences? Is it to relate to what’s already within us or do we grow? If so, how and where? Potential readings include: The Story Factor: Secrets of Influence from the Art of Storytelling, by Annette Simons; Postmodern Fairy Tales: Gender and Narrative Strategies, by Cristina Bacchilega; Strange as this Weather has Been, by Ann Pancake; Legend of a Suicide, by David Vann; A Childhood: The Biography of Place, by Harry Crews; There There by Tommy Orange; and My Year of Rest and Relaxation, by Ottessa Moshfegh.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: No

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 509

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: Dear Reader -

Fall 2021

Taught By: Tara Menon

Section: Q

CRN: 11174

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: DEAR READER — HYPOCRITE READER: "You—hypocrite reader—my double—my brother," Charles Baudelaire interpellates us, in a gesture of mingled accusation and complicity. How do writers imagine their audiences? What do we think of our readers? Who gets left out—on purpose or, more commonly, by accident? How do interpretive communities shape the texts they read? In this first-year writing seminar, we'll read letters, poems, essays, stories, manifestos by Yiyun Li, Jean-Paul Sartre, Claudia Rankine, Charlotte Bronte, Leslie Jamison, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Bertolt Brecht and many others to think about how and why—but also, prominently, for whom—we write.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: No

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 262

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: Illness and Healing

Fall 2021

Taught By: Christen Clifford

Section: T

CRN: 11170

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: ILLNESS AND HEALING. In this first-year writing seminar students will look at classic texts on illness and healing such as Susan Sontag's Illness As Metaphor and AIDS and its Metaphors and Audre Lorde's The Cancer Journals as well as essays on black women's maternal death rates and climate change. Is the earth sick? Why is chronic illness on the rise? Do mental illnesses need to be "cured"? We will formulate questions and learn to think on the page and research. The memes tells us if we heal ourselves we can heal the world. Students will write personal and research essays as well as look at news about the wellness industry and discuss current events in real time.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: No

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 618

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/13/2021

WTEI: Time After Time

Fall 2021

Taught By: M Milks

Section: U

CRN: 11176

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: TIME AFTER TIME: EXPERIMENTS WITH REVISION. In this first-year writing seminar, we will focus on what it means to write and rewrite through time: What does it mean to think about revision not only as a way to improve our writing but also as an opportunity to revisit the past and our present stories about it? We will study examples of writing and art that dive into the archives of history and play tricks with time—time travel narratives, alternate history, speculative nonfiction, and documentary/verbatim theater—and examine their various effects. Readings include essays, short stories, a play, and visual and performance art. Writing assignments will include a personal essay and a critical essay, with the option to develop a hybrid project that may involve photography, film, and performance.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: No

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: Eugene Lang 65 W11th

Room: 259

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: Your Fav Poet's Fav Poet

Fall 2021

Taught By: Emily Sernaker

Section: V

CRN: 11171

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: YOUR FAVORITE POET'S FAVORITE POET. is a class celebrating poetic lineage. Students will discover that every poet has to start somewhere – and that behind every good writer, is a good reader. Together, we will demystify the idea that poetry is for the select few and explore the art form through the lens of inclusivity, legacy and community. We will read and assess the work of poets recommended by Ross Gay, Airea D. Matthews, Mahogany L. Browne, Naomi Shihab Nye, Tongo Eisen-Martin, Dunya Mikhail, Gregory Pardlo, Marwa Helal, Joseph Millar, Tyehimba Jess, Hanif Abdurraqib, Ada Limón, Patricia Smith, Dorianne Laux, Tina Chang, Sharon Olds and more. Essay assignments will range from annotations on poetic craft to larger explorations of social justice, inspiration, risk-taking, imagination and permission. Students will also write essays identifying poetic choices that resonate and spark their imaginations, giving direction to their own creative work.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: No

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 410

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/13/2021

WTEI: The Retrospectoscope

Fall 2021

Taught By: Brie Bouslaugh

Section: X

CRN: 11172

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: The RETROSPECTOSCOPE: ON MEMORY AND SELF : In this first-year writing seminar we will explore the way memory shapes how we see ourselves, others and the world around us. How do the circumstances under which a memory is formed affect us? How does the language we use to talk to ourselves and about ourselves inform how we assemble our sense of self? To what extent is the act of forgetting actually a core component in identity-making? As the semester progresses we’ll explore work by science writers, essayists and novelists in an attempt to understand the malleable nature of memory and the impact it has on how we interact with our reality. Some authors who will help construct our own arguments about this deeply personal, but universal topic, include: Jorge Louis Borges, David Eagleman, Jill Bolte-Taylor, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Roland Barthes, Jamaica Kincaid and Tim O’Brien, among others. Steeped in their unique and varying points of view, we will then write two short essays and one longer rumination on the nature of memory and identity.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: No

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 501

Date Range: 8/31/2021 - 12/16/2021

WTEI: Stranger Than Fiction

Fall 2021

Taught By: Dianca Potts

Section: Y

CRN: 11173

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY I: How do we make sense of the unexplainable? What do stories about the paranormal reveal about the human condition and our imaginations? In this first-year writing seminar, students will delve into tales of extraordinary phenomena, folklore, urban legends, and encounters with the extraterrestrial and supernatural. From UFOs and poltergeists to doppelgängers and premonitions, this course will investigate what the unfathomable can teach us about the power of storytelling and personal truth. Through a multi-genre offering of readings, reflections, and prompts, students will examine how strange stories of the past and present explore the complexities of desire, fear, and belonging while crafting extraordinary works of their own. Students will read Alexander Chee, Kelly Link, Lesley Nneka Arimah, Elissa Washuta, Etgar Keret, Esmé Weijun Wang, Jordan Kisner, Mira Ptacin, Colin Dickey, Karen Russell, Otessa Moshfegh, Anthony Doerr, and others.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: No

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 3:28am 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 510

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/13/2021