LFYW

1500

Writing the Essay II

Eugene Lang College Lib Arts: Lang College

Liberal Arts

Undergraduate Course

Degree Students

WTEII: The Animal is Metaphor

Spring 2022

Taught By: Haley Hach

Section: A

CRN: 1214

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: THE ANIMAL IS METAPHOR. In this course we’ll read, discuss, write, define and explore how animals are used as potential to explain human experience. To study our relationship with animals (and nature) is to study our own subconciousness. We use animals and animal characteristics to define ourselves. Why? The complexity and irony of animal “otherness” furthering human behavior is a puzzling one. Why is a greedy person described as a pig? And why is goodness described as humanity? What are the origins of this way of thinking? The presence of animals are embedded in the language we use. Together, let’s untangle what’s already built within structures of sex and culture. Readings may include The Peregrine by JA Baker, Being a Beast by Charles Foster, The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory by Carol J. Adams, The Lumberjack’s Dove by Gennarose Nethercott and the glorious poetry of Kay Ryan.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII: Radical Memoir

Spring 2022

Taught By: Rebecca Reilly

Section: AA

CRN: 11835

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: RADICAL MEMOIR. In this first-year writing seminar we look at texts that defy the boundaries of genre to create a narrative form true to the fragmented, shifting composition of memory itself. Memoirist, diarist, theorist, philosopher: the authors we will consider perform the ongoing project of the construction of the self, or successive versions of self, through the creation of fragmented autobiographical texts. Students will write a series of essays responding to these texts and also learn to construct a longer, research paper. Authors considered will likely include Roland Barthes, James Baldwin, Anne Carson, Claudia Rankine, Beatriz Preciado, Teresa Hak-Kyung Cha, Wayne Koestenbaum, Edouard Louis, Brian Blanchfield and Saeed Jones.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTE II: Social Commentary

Spring 2022

Taught By: David Palmer

Section: B

CRN: 10710

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: SOCIAL COMMENTARY. This research-writing seminar is designed to make you more informative and persuasive in writing about social issues that matter to you and to your readers. The centerpiece of this course is the long-form social commentary, a 10-15-page essay, which will be the product of brainstorming, freewriting, tailored research, interim writing assignments, workshopping, drafting, redrafting, and critical feedback from your instructor, fellow students, and yourself. By term’s end, you will learn and practice basic research methodology by conducting strategic web-based searches and academic research. You will also learn and practice how to execute these methods into clear, engaging writing that speaks to issues of enduring significance. Course readings will be interdisciplinary in content and expansive in approach; they may include selections from Tressie McMillan Cottom, Elizabeth Colbert, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Eric Schlosser, Carl Hart, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Frances Lee, Danielle Allen, Jenny Odell, and others.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 6:00pm - 7:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

Writing the Essay II

Spring 2022

Taught By: Khaliah Williams

Section: BB

CRN: 11836

Credits: 4

Students resume the work of Writing the Essay I with activities that develop clear and forceful prose style through close reading and consistent writing and revision. Students are expected to learn research methods and produce at least one in-depth essay that requires library research.Each section of the course may focus on a specific discipline—such as literary criticism, psychology, or cultural studies—and its mode of essay writing (with reading and inquiry conducted at a higher level than in the previous semester).Writing the Essay 2 prepares students for the challenges of writing in a variety of concentrations since expectations often differ among the disciplines.

Prerequisite: Writing the Essay I

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 6:00pm - 7:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII: Being Young

Spring 2022

Taught By: Tara Menon

Section: C

CRN: 10117

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: BEING YOUNG. This course will examine the social, psychological and political concept of youth, as constructed by and reflected in a variety of texts by writers such as Mark Greif, James Baldwin, Arthur Rimbaud, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Eileen Myles, M.K. Gandhi and many more. We'll read poetry, fiction, letters and essays for, by and about the young--lyric celebrations of youth, nostalgic reflections on past youth, stories of formation as well as texts in which youth is the culmination of life. Each student will work on one extended research-based writing project that pertains to this topic.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII: Say It Anyway You Can

Spring 2022

Taught By: Emily Sernaker

Section: CC

CRN: 11837

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: SAY IT, SAY IT ANYWAY YOU CAN. Inspired by the Vievee Francis poem “Say it, Say it Anyway You Can,” this class will look at bravery in writing, speaking personal and political truths, and calling things what they are. The reading list includes: Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Elie Wiesel, Rebecca Solnit, Ocean Vuong, Tongo Eisen-Martin, Roxanne Gay, Vievee Francis, Toi Derricotte, Anne Lamott, Howard Zinn, Wendell Berry, Marian Wright Edelman, Paulo Freire, Florence Howe, Ellen Bass, Aracelis Girmay, Rachel Carson and more. Students will gain an understanding of how craft and courage can work together, and will create a portfolio of essays with attention to voice, topic, argument, innovation and power.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 6:00pm - 7:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII: The Depths of Boredom

Spring 2022

Taught By: Rollo Romig

Section: D

CRN: 10869

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: THE DEPTHS OF BOREDOM. Now more than ever, boring experiences threaten our enjoyment of life. Living in lockdown. Washing the dishes. Attending required college courses. But what do we mean when we call something "boring"? Where does boredom come from? And is there any benefit to being bored? In this first-year writing seminar we'll explore these questions and many more through an exciting and unpredictable selection of reading and writing assignments, with an emphasis on research skills. Topics may include: small talk, long speeches, the science of how we experience time, quarantine, smartphones, capitalism, chores, reality television, intentionally boring films, monks, meditation, mindfulness, opiates, prison, the Internal Revenue Service, the fear of missing out, the lives of zoo animals, summer vacation, heaven, and silence.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

Writing the Essay II

Spring 2022

Taught By: Faculty TBA

Section: DD

CRN: 11838

Credits: 4

Students resume the work of Writing the Essay I with activities that develop clear and forceful prose style through close reading and consistent writing and revision. Students are expected to learn research methods and produce at least one in-depth essay that requires library research.Each section of the course may focus on a specific discipline—such as literary criticism, psychology, or cultural studies—and its mode of essay writing (with reading and inquiry conducted at a higher level than in the previous semester).Writing the Essay 2 prepares students for the challenges of writing in a variety of concentrations since expectations often differ among the disciplines.

Prerequisite: Writing the Essay I

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII: Funny or Not

Spring 2022

Taught By: M Milks

Section: E

CRN: 10870

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: FUNNY OR NOT: THE CULTURAL POLITICS OF COMEDY. “There is nothing very benevolent about laughter,” wrote Henri Bergson in 1900. Indeed, laughter—and comedy, the discourse that aims to provoke it—can be quite cruel. In this writing-intensive course, we will examine the numerous ways in which comedy has been used to reflect and at times reshape often troubling social attitudes. We will explore the rhetorical strategies of a wide range of comedic genres and forms, from stand-up comedy to memes, investigating the politics and pleasures of both laughing and not. Why is a particular sign, situation, or performance funny—or not? What are the uses and effects of particular comedic traditions (e.g., language play, slapstick, parody, satire)? What does it mean to take up the role of a feminist killjoy, to be a spoilsport, to refuse to laugh at your boss’s or family member’s racist or sexist or transphobic or ableist joke? As we take up these questions, we will examine others’ arguments and construct our own in response, in the form of both academic and (optionally) comedic writing.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII:Return of The Queer Page

Spring 2022

Taught By: Miller Oberman

Section: F

CRN: 10882

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: RETURN OF THE QUEER PAGE. In this first-year seminar we will read, discuss, and respond in writing to a multiplicity of queer texts, from foundational works of queer theory to contemporary fiction, essays and poetry. This course will consider the relationship between body and text, and we will practice close reading a wide range of LGBTQIA textual bodies; queer pages that work to counter hegemonic norms. This course will be a practice in how to incorporate ourselves into our research, and we will explore the intersections of personal essay and scholarly research. This course views research as a conversation and an act of community and solidarity. We will practice responsible and rigorous engagement in the intersections of our own experiences and the (written) experiences of others, learning how to place ourselves among them. We will practice how to speak with, and not for. We will read queerly, and define what that means for us as we go along. Texts may include work by: Sara Ahmed, Judith Butler, Samuel Delaney, Audre Lorde, E. Patrick Johnson, José Esteban Muñoz, Dean Spade, Candace Williams, and Monique Wittig.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 2:00pm - 3:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII: The Meaning of Myth

Spring 2022

Taught By: Stephen Massimilla

Section: G

CRN: 1809

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: THE MEANING OF MYTH. In this first-year research seminar, we will discuss and write about an exciting range of myths in order to develop key composition and research skills. Myth is a far-reaching category that intersects with such fields as literature, history, philosophy, anthropology, sociology, theology, gender studies, political science, and psychology. Myths are said to address the origin and nature of things, how people should act, what motivates human behavior, and what it means to be human. Readings cover many genres and may include short foundational Western and non-Western tales, such as the Hymn to Demeter and the Inanna tales; excerpts from longer texts such as Genesis and The Odyssey; selected short works such as Grimms’ Fairy Tales, Wells’ Time Machine, Eliot’s Waste Land, and Camus’ “Myth of Sisyphus"; the poetry of Anne Sexton, Adrienne Rich, and others; and essays by Darwin, Marx, Freud, Jung, Malinowski, Campbell, and Eliade. The class also addresses mythic themes in visual art, and how myths continue to inform politics and contemporary thought. In the course of composing and workshopping essays related to the readings, students will explore how to formulate interesting questions, conduct close readings, construct and organize arguments, locate apt sources, marshal evidence, improve grammatical clarity, and reorganize and revise. Essays build toward a fully developed research paper.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII: Radical Memoir

Spring 2022

Taught By: Rebecca Reilly

Section: H

CRN: 1817

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: RADICAL MEMOIR. In this first-year writing seminar we look at texts that defy the boundaries of genre to create a narrative form true to the fragmented, shifting composition of memory itself. Memoirist, diarist, theorist, philosopher: the authors we will consider perform the ongoing project of the construction of the self, or successive versions of self, through the creation of fragmented autobiographical texts. Students will write a series of essays responding to these texts and also learn to construct a longer, research paper. Authors considered will likely include Roland Barthes, James Baldwin, Anne Carson, Claudia Rankine, Beatriz Preciado, Teresa Hak-Kyung Cha, Wayne Koestenbaum, Edouard Louis, Brian Blanchfield and Saeed Jones.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII: Our Living Ghost

Spring 2022

Taught By: Haley Hach

Section: I

CRN: 10954

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: OUR LIVING GHOST: PERSPECTIVES IN THE EXPERIENCE OF LEAVING HOME. In this first-year research seminar, we will examine various theories and perspectives on the notion of leaving home. How many ways are there to leave home? What is responsible for the impressions we keep and what is lost? What do we lose about ourselves—and why—and what do we gain? How does the concept of home—once we define it—move through us and, most importantly, why does the mapping of these changes of these perspectives prove so fascinating for writers, artists and philosophers? From coming-of-age narratives, to political homelessness, exile, family trauma, we will read memoirs, essays, and novels. Students will write four critical response papers, conduct research and explore their beliefs and challenge assumptions as we ruminate on concepts and perspectives in the experience of leaving home.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII: Rape Culture

Spring 2022

Taught By: Christen Clifford

Section: J

CRN: 10968

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: WHAT IS RAPE CULTURE? Ugh. It’s everywhere. But what is Rape Culture? This first-year writing and research seminar looks at sexual violence in literature and pop culture and asks students to consider different, perhaps difficult, points of view. We will investigate social and political issues including violence, equality, sexual justice and patriarchy through critical writing and art from the 1970s to the present. Digital events will be looked at in real time during the months this class is in session. This course emphasizes close readings and a research paper.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII: The Problem of the Body

Spring 2022

Taught By: Helen Rubinstein

Section: K

CRN: 10969

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: THE PROBLEM OF THE BODY. Although the liberal arts are often considered a home for the mind, writers and researchers have increasingly turned toward the body—our bodies—as a site of scholarly investigation. This course will survey that recent work, ranging across the fields of queer theory, critical race theory, disability studies, medicine, psychoanalysis, psychosomatics, and more, to provide a springboard for students' own research into bodily questions of their choice. At the same time, we'll consider the problems of the textual "bodies" we encounter as researchers—the archive, the library, the scholarly journal, the internet—and how these, like our breathing bodies, might be impacted by the structures, systems, and communities we live within. How are our bodies continuous with, rather than distinct from, our minds? And how are our bodies continuous with the communities, environments, histories, and climates we live in? Authors may include Ariella Azoulay, Anne Boyer, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Saidiya Hartman, Alex Marzano-Lesnevich, Resmaa Menakem, Paul Preciado, Eve Tuck, Bessel Van der Kolk, & K. Wayne Yang.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 2:00pm - 3:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII: Freedom, Cut Me Loose

Spring 2022

Taught By: Brianna Williams

Section: L

CRN: 10982

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: FREEDOM, CUT ME LOOSE. In this writing and research seminar, we will begin by analyzing multi-genre texts to, first, adequately define “freedom,” its historical antecedents, and the contemporary conditions required to sustain it. We will determine who is “free” and at what (or whose) expense, and, ultimately, come to understand that one’s physical identity -- ethnic, racial, sexual, gendered, disabled or miscegenated -- designates different degrees of freedom or a lack thereof, that external identity often becomes one’s fate. We will explore how formerly marginalized peoples -- of both native and immigrant populations -- diverged from their fate to gain more “freedom,” achieved it, or, more likely, found themselves lodged in the in-between as exiles in their own home. We will discuss how numerous economies rely on the oversimplified labels of identity politics in order to maintain a profit-driven status quo and their consequent implications on one’s physical, mental and spiritual personhood. Finally, we will work on crafting a path for healing/retribution through the self-narration of internal and intersectional experience, collective imagination as well as structural change for, if not “freedom,” actualization, and independence from an archaic system of thought. As a scholarly community, we’ll welcome merging personal questions with individual research projects to locate new ways of viewing the old, to challenge convention, and place our experiences amongst contexts outside of our own. In order to do so, we will begin by actively listening to others. Only after demonstrating our understanding of what has been said, will we be rightfully motivated to find our own voice in scholarly conversation.Readings may include works by André Aciman, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, James Baldwin, Judith Butler, Patrick Chamoiseau, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Jack Halberstam, Cheryl Harris, Cathy Park Hong, Audre Lorde, Richard Rodriguez, Vershawn Ashanti Young, Beyoncé, and others.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII: Danger of Single Story

Spring 2022

Taught By: Bureen Ruffin

Section: M

CRN: 10970

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: THE DANGER OF A SINGLE STORY: REWRITING IDENTITY. Today we are witnessing huge shifts in attitudes toward how we, collectively and individually, want to identify and claim ourselves. We are asking—some of us for the first time: Who am I? Who do I want to be? How do I rewrite my story? At this moment in time, we are deciding to reject the destructive and often divisive categories + oppressive histories of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexual orientation. We are now rewriting the (his)story, so to speak, and choosing to flood the world with new stories that reflect our truth, evolution, and desire to live our lives with authenticity + power. This first-year research seminar asks students to explore the ways postcolonial writers have reimagined and rewritten their history in the quest to reclaim their personal, cultural, and national identities. Students will have the opportunity to engage with this practice by conducting research, writing, workshopping, and revising their writing. We will read a variety of post-colonial writers and critics, which may include Derek Walcott, Jean Rhys, Jamaica Kincaid, Earl Lovelace, Maxine Hong Kingston, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Chinua Achebe, Edward Said, Kamau Brathwaite, Dionne Brand, Arundathi Roy, and others.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 6:00pm - 7:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII: States of Play

Spring 2022

Taught By: Brie Bouslaugh

Section: N

CRN: 10971

Credits: 4

Students resume the work of Writing the Essay I with activities that develop clear and forceful prose style through close reading and consistent writing and revision. Students are expected to learn research methods and produce at least one in-depth essay that requires library research.Each section of the course may focus on a specific discipline—such as literary criticism, psychology, or cultural studies—and its mode of essay writing (with reading and inquiry conducted at a higher level than in the previous semester).Writing the Essay 2 prepares students for the challenges of writing in a variety of concentrations since expectations often differ among the disciplines.

Prerequisite: Writing the Essay I

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 2:00pm - 3:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII:Coming of Age in America

Spring 2022

Taught By: Jonathan Liebson

Section: O

CRN: 10972

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: COMING OF AGE IN AMERICA. Baudelaire says that “genius is…childhood recaptured,” and without question some of our most important fiction—from Twain to Salinger to Harper Lee—is rendered through the eyes of younger protagonists. In this first-year research seminar we’ll explore a variety of short story writers and characters of diverse backgrounds, regions, and ethnicities, including Jamaica Kincaid, Junot Diaz, Maile Meloy, Edward P. Jones, and Sandra Cisneros, who together reveal the complexity of what growing up in America entails. We’ll consider the struggle for identity and belonging, but also for self-determination and independence, amidst mainstream expectations of community, family, or tradition. The course emphasizes close-reading, multiple drafts of essays, and proficiency with research skills, culminating in a longer final research paper.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII: What's Love...?

Spring 2022

Taught By: Nkosi Bandele

Section: P

CRN: 10973

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: WHAT'S LOVE GOT TO DO WITH IT? It is taken as a given that the word “love” functions as a signifier in society, but the question of what precisely it signifies remains elusive. In this first-year research seminar, students read and write about romantic love. Is it just a fantasy, something we hope to be true? Or a reality, for those who are lucky or who work hard to make it true? Students consider whether romantic love is a socially-constructed illusion or merely an elaborate rationalization for physical desire. To do this effectively, students must hone their skills for reading, analyzing, and thinking critically about how notions of romantic love are strongly influenced by cultural assumption. In the process, students are required to think through complicated issues, write in order to critically examine that thinking, share their ideas, and make arguments based on their perspectives and understanding. Authors include William Shakespeare, e.e. cummings, Sharon Olds, and Laura Kipnis.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII: Mix and Match

Spring 2022

Taught By: Rachel Aydt

Section: Q

CRN: 10974

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: MIX AND MATCH: THE POSSIBILITIES OF GENRES. In this first-year research seminar, we'll explore works that use experimental forms to push boundaries in creativity and meaning. From epistolary form to retelling of mythologies to prose poetry we'll discuss how your ideas can be enhanced by playing with form. How can you weave together sociology with personal narrative or personal narrative with cultural criticism? Throughout the semester, as you experiment with your own hybrid forms, we'll read James Baldwin, Matthea Harvey, Eula Biss, Kate Tempest, Anne Carter, N. Scott Momaday, Olivia Laing, William Burroughs, Anne Waldman, and more. The course will culminate in a research project.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII: Danger of Single Story

Spring 2022

Taught By: Bureen Ruffin

Section: R

CRN: 11015

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: THE DANGER OF A SINGLE STORY: REWRITING IDENTITY. Today we are witnessing huge shifts in attitudes toward how we, collectively and individually, want to identify and claim ourselves. We are asking—some of us for the first time: Who am I? Who do I want to be? How do I rewrite my story? At this moment in time, we are deciding to reject the destructive and often divisive categories + oppressive histories of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexual orientation. We are now rewriting the (his)story, so to speak, and choosing to flood the world with new stories that reflect our truth, evolution, and desire to live our lives with authenticity + power. This first-year research seminar asks students to explore the ways postcolonial writers have reimagined and rewritten their history in the quest to reclaim their personal, cultural, and national identities. Students will have the opportunity to engage with this practice by conducting research, writing, workshopping, and revising their writing. We will read a variety of post-colonial writers and critics, which may include Derek Walcott, Jean Rhys, Jamaica Kincaid, Earl Lovelace, Maxine Hong Kingston, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Chinua Achebe, Edward Said, Kamau Brathwaite, Dionne Brand, Arundathi Roy, and others.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII: The Depths of Boredom

Spring 2022

Taught By: Rollo Romig

Section: S

CRN: 10975

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: THE DEPTHS OF BOREDOM. Now more than ever, boring experiences threaten our enjoyment of life. Living in lockdown. Washing the dishes. Attending required college courses. But what do we mean when we call something "boring"? Where does boredom come from? And is there any benefit to being bored? In this first-year writing seminar we'll explore these questions and many more through an exciting and unpredictable selection of reading and writing assignments, with an emphasis on research skills. Topics may include: small talk, long speeches, the science of how we experience time, quarantine, smartphones, capitalism, chores, reality television, intentionally boring films, monks, meditation, mindfulness, opiates, prison, the Internal Revenue Service, the fear of missing out, the lives of zoo animals, summer vacation, heaven, and silence.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII: Reproductive Freedom

Spring 2022

Taught By: Liz Latty

Section: T

CRN: 10976

Credits: 4

Students resume the work of Writing the Essay I with activities that develop clear and forceful prose style through close reading and consistent writing and revision. Students are expected to learn research methods and produce at least one in-depth essay that requires library research.Each section of the course may focus on a specific discipline—such as literary criticism, psychology, or cultural studies—and its mode of essay writing (with reading and inquiry conducted at a higher level than in the previous semester).Writing the Essay 2 prepares students for the challenges of writing in a variety of concentrations since expectations often differ among the disciplines.

Prerequisite: Writing the Essay I

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII: Immigrant Voices

Spring 2022

Taught By: Olga Breydo

Section: U

CRN: 10955

Credits: 4

Students resume the work of Writing the Essay I with activities that develop clear and forceful prose style through close reading and consistent writing and revision. Students are expected to learn research methods and produce at least one in-depth essay that requires library research.Each section of the course may focus on a specific discipline—such as literary criticism, psychology, or cultural studies—and its mode of essay writing (with reading and inquiry conducted at a higher level than in the previous semester).Writing the Essay 2 prepares students for the challenges of writing in a variety of concentrations since expectations often differ among the disciplines.

Prerequisite: Writing the Essay I

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 4:00pm - 5:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII: Human Rights

Spring 2022

Taught By: Pamela Sneed

Section: V

CRN: 10977

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: HUMAN RIGHTS: ARTISTIC RESPONSES-EMPHASIS ON THE PERSONAL ESSAY AND HYBRID LITERATURE.Through selected readings, essay, poetry, combined forms, film, historical perspectives and current events, this course will examine human rights, human expression, themes of survival, freedom, what makes us human to violations of human rights domestically and globally. Through writing prompts and assignments, Writers in the course will respond to given materials with some elements of research over time. We will examine issues of race, women’s rights, immigrant rights feminism, lgtbqi issues, class and workers rights, asking questions such as Where do the personal and political interface in literature? How do artists and respond writers articulate and intervene in human rights abuses? Do artists have a responsibility in record keeping? What constitutes political writing? What is the writers role in society? Can craft and political writing coexist? We will also discuss issues such as self vs. governmental censorship and visibility vs. invisibility. Is writing inherently activism? Some of the writers surveyed will be Safiya Bukhari, Hannah Arendt, Kevin Bales, Sadiya Hartman, Joy Harjo, Karen Finley, Angela Davis, James Baldwin, Ta-Nehesi Coates, Chimamanda Adiche, and more.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 2:00pm - 3:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII: Undressing Fashion

Spring 2022

Taught By: Shahnaz Habib

Section: W

CRN: 10978

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: UNDRESSING FASHION. Fashion is often considered too shallow a topic for serious writers. Yet whenever we wear clothes, we are participating in personal rituals and cultural systems. We will begin the course by writing about what fashion means to us. How do we represent ourselves, knowingly or obliviously, through our fashion choices? We will use academic and literary readings to understand how fashion mythologies are created, and who is left out of these mythologies. Approaching fashion from a number of angles, from sustainability to appropriation, we will read writers such as bell hooks, Hilary Mantel, Jia Tolentino, and Shahida Bari, and consider the work of artists such as Frida Kahlo and Paul Rucker. This course encourages students to explore research as an aid to thinking and writing critically about fashion and will culminate in a final essay at the intersection of fashion and social justice.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 12:00pm - 1:40pm

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII: Undressing Fashion

Spring 2022

Taught By: Shahnaz Habib

Section: Y

CRN: 10979

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: UNDRESSING FASHION. Fashion is often considered too shallow a topic for serious writers. Yet whenever we wear clothes, we are participating in personal rituals and cultural systems. We will begin the course by writing about what fashion means to us. How do we represent ourselves, knowingly or obliviously, through our fashion choices? We will use academic and literary readings to understand how fashion mythologies are created, and who is left out of these mythologies. Approaching fashion from a number of angles, from sustainability to appropriation, we will read writers such as bell hooks, Hilary Mantel, Jia Tolentino, and Shahida Bari, and consider the work of artists such as Frida Kahlo and Paul Rucker. This course encourages students to explore research as an aid to thinking and writing critically about fashion and will culminate in a final essay at the intersection of fashion and social justice.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Tuesday, Thursday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/25/2022 - 5/12/2022

WTEII: The Lives of Others

Spring 2022

Taught By: Faculty TBA

Section: Z

CRN: 11834

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: THE LIVES OF OTHERS. One of the most dominant and popular forms of essay writing is the personal essay, in which authors explore facets of their own lives. But some of the best essays have often taken as their subject other people, be they strangers, eccentrics, family members, celebrities, politicians, or criminals. In this first-year seminar we will read, discuss, and respond to essays about the lives of others. We will consider the relationship between author and subject, explore approaches to nonfiction characterization, and discuss the ethics of writing about actual, living people. Texts may include work by: Martin Amis, David Foster Wallace, Ralph Ellison, Jia Tolentino, Hilton Als, Julian Lucas, and Janet Malcolm.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: February 6, 2022 (Sunday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: April 17, 2022 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Open*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:26pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 8:00am - 9:40am

Building: TBD

Room: TBD

Date Range: 1/24/2022 - 5/16/2022

WTEII: Freedom, Cut Me Loose

Fall 2021

Taught By: Brianna Williams

Section: A

CRN: 11154

Credits: 4

WRITING THE ESSAY II: FREEDOM, CUT ME LOOSE. In this writing and research seminar, we will begin by analyzing multi-genre texts to, first, adequately define “freedom,” its historical antecedents, and the contemporary conditions required to sustain it. We will determine who is “free” and at what (or whose) expense, and, ultimately, come to understand that one’s physical identity -- ethnic, racial, sexual, gendered, disabled or miscegenated -- designates different degrees of freedom or a lack thereof, that external identity often becomes one’s fate. We will explore how formerly marginalized peoples -- of both native and immigrant populations -- diverged from their fate to gain more “freedom,” achieved it, or, more likely, found themselves lodged in the in-between as exiles in their own home. We will discuss how numerous economies rely on the oversimplified labels of identity politics in order to maintain a profit-driven status quo and their consequent implications on one’s physical, mental and spiritual personhood. Finally, we will work on crafting a path for healing/retribution through the self-narration of internal and intersectional experience, collective imagination as well as structural change for, if not “freedom,” actualization, and independence from an archaic system of thought. As a scholarly community, we’ll welcome merging personal questions with individual research projects to locate new ways of viewing the old, to challenge convention, and place our experiences amongst contexts outside of our own. In order to do so, we will begin by actively listening to others. Only after demonstrating our understanding of what has been said, will we be rightfully motivated to find our own voice in scholarly conversation.Readings may include works by André Aciman, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, James Baldwin, Judith Butler, Patrick Chamoiseau, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Jack Halberstam, Cheryl Harris, Cathy Park Hong, Audre Lorde, Richard Rodriguez, Vershawn Ashanti Young, Beyoncé, and others.

College: Eugene Lang College Lib Arts (LC)

Department: Lang College (LNGC)

Campus: New York City (GV)

Course Format: Seminar (R)

Max Enrollment: 18

Add/Drop Deadline: September 13, 2021 (Monday)

Online Withdrawal Deadline: November 21, 2021 (Sunday)

Seats Available: Yes

Status: Closed*

* Status information is updated every five minutes. The status of this course may have changed since the last update. Open seats may have restrictions that will prevent some students from registering. Updated: 6:27pm 10/22/2021 EDT

Meeting Info:

Days: Monday, Wednesday

Times: 10:00am - 11:40am

Building: Johnson/Kaplan 66 West 12th

Room: 502

Date Range: 8/30/2021 - 12/13/2021